The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Journal Article

What is the K in KM Technology  pp11-22

Kavi Mahesh, J. K. Suresh

© Apr 2005 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 44

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Abstract

This article addresses the problem of how technology adds value to an overall KM solution. It presents the core problem of KM as matching contexts using knowledge attributes and defines KM technology as that which manages knowledge attributes. The paper illustrates this by analyzing several positive and negative examples of technologies and presents two challenges for knowledge management as a field. The requirement for KM technology to manage knowledge attributes can be applied in designing effective KM solutions, selecting KM products, devising a proper KM strategy, and controlling investments in KM. The definition of KM technology also provides a focus for research to bridge gaps in technology that currently limit the widespread use of knowledge attributes.

 

Keywords: KM technology, knowledge attribute, knowledge representation, context matching

 

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Journal Article

Reconsidering Knowledgeƒ And Business Improvement  pp61-70

Larry Lucardie, Paul Hendriks, Joost van Ham

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

The ever growing complexity of market processes continues to increase the importance of knowledge as the organization's core capability to maximize business performance. Current conceptions of knowledge and knowledge representation, however, prove to be highly unproductive. A fundamental problem here is that insight into the nature of knowledge is an inevitable requirement for adequate knowledge management that, nevertheless, is hardly met in business. In this article, we claim that adopting a functional view of the nature of knowledge reveals and restores the relation between knowledge and corporate effectiveness. In a functional approach to conceptualization, functional equivalence instead of observable similarity serves as the basis for classification. The sets of conditions that have to be met in a particular situation are here taken as functional demands. These functional demands may vary across situations, thus precluding the valid possibility of a static one‑on‑ one connection between functions and individual objects. Not the objects as potential instances of classes, but the relationships between objects given their properties and situations, defined in terms of functional demands, become central. These relationships define the concepts, and thus what we know. Classification amounts to relational matching of specified situations to specified objects. The functional view not only enables content improvement through rational classifications, but also enhances process designs, implementations and process maintenance. It also aligns information technology to the new demands set by the knowledge economy by enabling goal‑oriented, transparent and easy‑to‑use‑and‑modify knowledge structures. The paper further describes a real world case taken from the financial services industry to exemplify how a functional analysis of knowledge ‑including to the functional view aligned MatchÂ’ Technology‑ realizes great improvements in business performance.

 

Keywords: knowledge representation formalisms, functional view, rational classifications, functional equivalence, Match

 

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Journal Article

A Framework for Assessing Commensurability of Semantic Web Ontologies  pp91-102

Liam Magee

© Jan 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Ettore Bolisani, Enrico Scarso, pp1 - 180

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Abstract

The Semantic Web proposes a framework for establishing a "web of data", analogous to the "web of documents" of the World Wide Web. It envisions a series of interconnected ontologies, underwritten by formal languages such as OWL and RDF. The problem of co‑ordinating disparate ontologies has led to the development of various ontology matching approaches. However, as these approaches are algorithmic they cannot make use of background or tacit information about the ontologies they examine — information only available in the broader social context in which ontologies are created and used. In many practical knowledge management scenarios, such information is vital in understanding the costs, feasibility and scope of ontology alignment projects. Prior to undertaking the detailed task of concept‑to‑concept mapping between two ontologies, it is therefore useful to ask: are these ontologies broadly commensurable? This paper presents a framework for describing and comparing cultural information about ontologies, developed as part of a joint project conducted by RMIT University and FujiXerox Australia, "Towards the 'Semantic Web': Standards and Interoperability across Document Management and Publishing Supply Chains". The framework is intended for practitioners to use as a tool to arrive at better estimates and assessments of the scope of work required to develop an adequate translation between two or more ontologies. The framework has been piloted as an online software toolkit, which is presented to a small group of participants. After using the software, participants complete an evaluation, which elicits quantitative and qualitative feedback on both the framework and the software. The paper presents the results of the pilot testing process, along with some considerations of how the framework might be further improved.

 

Keywords: ontology matching, commensurability, knowledge-producing cultures

 

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