The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

For info on the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), click here
Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
To join the EJKM review committee click here
 

Journal Article

At the Crossroads of Knowledge Management and Social Software  pp1-10

Gabriela Avram

© Dec 2005 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The growing phenomenon of Social Software seems to provide an opportunity to complement the top‑down approach based on central knowledge repositories with tools that are simpler, smarter and more flexible. This article in‑ cludes a brief description of the main categories of Social Software — weblogs, wikis and social networking sites — fol‑ lowed by an analysis of their utilisation in relation to the five core Knowledge Management activities of the Knowledge Management taxonomy proposed by Despres & Chauvel in 1999. Examples that illustrate the support Social Software could provide for knowledge management are presented. Finally, some of the problems that hinder the usage of Social Software tools, together with some of the latest developments and trends in the field are mentioned.

 

Keywords: Social Software, weblog, wiki, social networks, knowledge acquisition, knowledge sharing

 

Share |

Journal Article

Mapping Social Networks among Crystallographers in South Africa  pp83-92

Gretchen Smith

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The author adopts the premise that technological innovation, a critical factor in the long‑term economic growth of any country, can only function successfully within a social environment that provides relevant knowledge and information inputs into the innovative process. This is dependent on the efficient transfer and communication of knowledge and information which in turn relates to the amount and quality of interaction among scientists and technologists. These factors prompted a research project that used social network analysis techniques to investigate knowledge exchange and to map the knowledge network structure and communication practices of a group of scientists engaged with crystallographic research. This paper is based on this research project. The findings provide clear evidence of a strong social network structure among crystallographers in South Africa. A core nucleus of prominent, well connected and interrelated crystallographers constituted the central network of scientists that provided the main impetus to keep the network active. This eminent group of crystallographers were not only approached far more frequently for information and advice than any of their colleagues, but they also frequently initiated interpersonal and formal information communication acts. It was clear that this core group had achieved a standard of excellence in their work, were highly productive; very visible in their professional community and they generally played a pivotal role in the social network. They generally maintained a high professional profile in the crystallography community and within the general field of science, published profusely, and generally emerged as the archetypal sociometric stars in their field. It is thus clear that high productivity, professional involvement, innovation capacity and network connectivity are intricately interwoven. The crystallographers' work environment and concomitant work structure clearly affected network interaction. Working in a group structure stimulated network interaction, professional activity and productivity. A further benefit was that the leaders of these groups generally assumed gatekeeper roles that facilitated networking and ensured the importation and interpretation of new information and knowledge. It was clear that social networks operate more effectively in areas, such as Gauteng, where a sufficient number of scientists were amassed.

 

Keywords: knowledge transfer information communication social networks crystallographers scientists

 

Share |

Journal Article

Social Networking and the Transfer of Knowledge  pp165-178

Graeme Smith

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECKM 2008, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 198

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

For the purpose of this paper, supply chain management is the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the operations as efficiently as possible within the sales and marketing environment. The supply chain spans the tracking of all transactions from the identification of prospective customers; through quote to order conversion; fulfilment; and on to post sales support. As an intense human activity customer supply chains are wholly dependent on knowledge and require social network activity to transfer that knowledge to the point of need in order to reduce process variation. This paper builds upon work undertaken previously by the author, which developed an organisational model of the social interactions affecting knowledge transfer within organisations (Smith et al 2003). This paper also discusses the problems of knowledge location, the ability to share (as well as willingness); the prevention of knowledge attrition through a programme of knowledge definition (codification); knowledge retention; and knowledge transfer across the customer interface. The argument is made that whilst much information is being shared, the knowledge that makes such information useful must also be transferred or new desired outcomes will not emerge. In order to share such knowledge, lessons were learned from three major studies that were carried out in 2004, 2006 and 2007; to determine the extent of failure to transfer knowledge within the sales and marketing supply chain at Ordnance Survey. As a result of these studies, a programme of work was put in place to identify knowledge silos, acting as centres of excellence in the supply chain putting in place a project to preserve and transfer knowledge from these silos, to facilitate learning and reduce knowledge attrition. This paper focuses on empirical evidence from these studies and the impact that this knowledge management project has had on the efficacy of the supply chain to deliver the desired outcomes.

 

Keywords: knowledge management knowledge transfer social networks supply chain business process management

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 1 / Jan 2006  pp1‑90

Editor: Charles Despres

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: Active learning, Africa, Business intelligence, Case study, Cognitive diversity, CommonKADS], Communication, Complexity, Complexity representation , Complexity theory, Complexity thinking, Cross-functional teams, e-Commerce, Enterprise semantic web, First order reflection, Group dynamics, Human capital, Intellectual capital, Knowledge acquisition, Knowledge acquisition, Knowledge capital, Knowledge cooperation, Knowledge co-production, Knowledge creation, Knowledge flows, Knowledge learning, Knowledge sharing, Knowledge transfer, Knowledge transfer cycle, Lightweight ontologies, Organisational practices, Performance measurement, Predictive maintenance, Relational capital, Second order reflection, Semantic information retrieval, Semantic interoperability, Social networks, Social Software, Software development, Structural capital, Tourism, Value creation, Weblog, Wiki

 

Share |