The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

Who’s on Stage? The Roles of the Project Sponsor and of the Project Leader in IC Reporting  pp183-193

Maria Serena Chiucchi, Marco Giuliani

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Linking Theory and Practice in Intellectual Capital, Editor: Dr. Ilídio Tomás Lopes and Dr. Rogério Marques Serrasqueiro, pp145 - 212

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Abstract

Despite the plethora of IC reporting frameworks proposed by scholars and practitioners, their adoption is still not widespread in practice. In other words, IC seems to be more preached than practiced (Dumay, 2009, Chiucchi, 2013b, Lönnqvist et al., 2009). As a consequence, various studies have examined which are the levers and the obstacles that can influence the adoption, use and diffusion of IC reporting practices (Dumay, 2012, Lönnqvist et al., 2009, Catasús et al., 2007, Catasús and Gröjer, 2006, Chiucchi and Montemari, 2016, Giuliani et al., 2016). Levers and barriers can be related to the technical‑objective side of IC, i.e. how IC is measured and managed, or to its organizational‑subjective side, i.e. who measures and manages IC (Chiucchi et al., 2016). While there are some studies that aim to understand the technical sides (Giuliani, 2016, Giuliani, 2014, Giuliani et al., 2016, Dumay and Rooney, 2011, Catasús et al., 2007, Catasús and Gröjer, 2006), the subjective side of IC appears to be underinvestigated (Chaminade and Roberts, 2003, Chiucchi, 2013a, Chiucchi, 2013b). Moving from these considerations, the aim of this study is to examine the roles played by the “project sponsor” (PS) and the “project leader” (PL) in the design and implementation process of an IC reporting project. In order to achieve this aim the results of an exploratory field study (Roslender and Hart, 2003, Lillis and Mundy, 2005) referred to Italian companies that adopted an IC report will be presented. Our study adds to IC literature by showing, from a practice‑based perspective, the roles played by the PSs and of the PLs in different organizations and how they are determinant in the decision to undertake these projects, in their accomplishment, prosecution and abandonment. In particular, it emerges that PSs and PLs have a relevant role in the IC sensegiving and sensemaking processes: their specialization influence the way IC is perceived within the company and the fate of the IC report, i.e. in determining the success or the failure of the IC projects.

 

Keywords: Intellectual Capital, reporting, measurements, actors, project sponsor, project leader, field study, Italy, intangibles

 

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Journal Article

Developing an Instrument for Knowledge Management Project Evaluation  pp61-68

Zuhair Iftikhar

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 68

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Abstract

Many knowledge management (KM) projects have been initiated, some of which have been successes but many have been failures. Measuring the success or failure of KM initiatives is not easy, and in order to do so some kind of measurement process has to be available. There are three points at which evaluation of KM projects can, and should be, done: (1) when deciding whether to start and where to focus, (2) once under way, following up on a project and making adjustments if needed, and (3) when completed, to evaluate the project outcomes. This paper concentrates on the first two areas by developing a general instrument for evaluation of KM projects.

 

Keywords: Knowledge management, Evaluation process, Measurement instrument, Success factors

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management Success Factors — Proposal of an Empirical Research  pp79-90

Franz Lehner, Nicolas Haas

© Jan 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Ettore Bolisani, Enrico Scarso, pp1 - 180

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Abstract

It is widely accepted that knowledge management is a critical success factor for enterprises. Not yet known sufficiently are the factors, which influence the success of knowledge management in order to measure the effectiveness of knowledge management. This paper sets out a quantitative study to investigate these factors. Firstly, an overview of empirical work undertaken and the potential success factors is given. After this, the methodology of the study is described. Thereby the basics of structure equation modelling (SEM) are shown. The difference between structure and measurement model is depicted and different validity measures are described. Also two common and possible methods to evaluate a SEM, the co‑variance analysis and the variance analysis are displayed. Thirdly a specific model is presented to use SEM in the context of knowledge management success. The model is based on the theory of planned behaviour and is adapted to the context of knowledge management success. Thereby knowledge management success is seen on an individual level, which means that successful knowledge management leads to a satisfying knowledge supply of the organisation member. Finally limitations of the work are discussed.

 

Keywords: KM success, critical success factors, structural equation model, PLS, LISREL

 

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Journal Article

Methods and Tools for Knowledge Management in Research Centres  pp293-306

Jean-Louis Ermine

© Nov 2010 Volume 8 Issue 3, Editor: David O'Donnell, pp267 - 344

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Abstract

In the Knowledge Based Economy, research centres whether industrial or public, play a fundamental role. In terms of Knowledge Management, these organisations have a special status, because their production is knowledge and only knowledge. The Knowledge Capital they accumulate in their activities therefore is a strong strategic issue and the management of these assets has become crucial. The problem addressed in this paper is to design a pertinent methodology for Knowledge Management considering the specificity of knowledge production by research centres. This methodology is based on a suitable model to describe that knowledge production. The reference model is built on knowledge flows between the organisation and its knowledge workers, and a subsystem called “Knowledge Capital”. A research centre is defined by the fact that its product is only knowledge and is accumulated in its knowledge subsystem. Some economical characteristics of this Knowledge Capital are shown as being very adapted to knowledge produced in research centres. The methodology is based on two tools. The first tool is the knowledge map that can represent a comprehensive model of the Knowledge Capital of the organisation, which is often not well known or unstructured. That map is built on a shared and consensual vision of the main knowledge actors. It is not a map produced by a knowledge tool, but a co‑construction (through interviews) with the knowledge actors. The second tool is a grid for criticality analysis (Critical Knowledge Factors), which evaluates the knowledge domains of the organisation and suggests appropriate actions to be put in place for the most critical domains. This tool is a guide for interviewing knowledgeable actors in the organisation, to collect and analyse a set of data for decision support. The aim of the methodology is to provide a set of recommendations to build a KM plan of actions to preserve, share and make evolve the Knowledge Capital. The methodology has been elaborated through constant feed‑back with practice, and has been validated in many real cases in various countries. Three case studies (France, Brazil, and Canada) are succinctly described to exemplify the effectiveness of the methodology.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, knowledge capital, research centre, knowledge map, critical knowledge factors

 

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Journal Article

An empirical Investigation of Maturity Levels in Knowledge Management  pp221-231

Ute Vanini, Saskia Bochert

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, ECIC 2014, Editor: Dagmar Caganova, pp187 - 272

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Abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyse if knowledge management maturity models can be applied in corporate practice. So far, empirical studies have mainly examined the influence of knowledge management (KM) on innovation and have identified K M success factors. The underlying assumption is that more KM leads to more innovation and an improved corporate success. Therefore, a thorough KM application is recommended. Little attention has been paid to the question which level of KM application is e ffective and efficient for a company. This paper tries to close this gap using the concept of KM maturity. It investigates if different KM maturity levels can be identified in corporate practice and in how far they are influenced by specific factors, e.g. company size. To answer the research questions, exploratory case studies were conducted through semi‑structured qualitative interviews with representatives from ten northern German companies.The results show that the practical applicability of KM maturit y models (KMMM) is still limited. None of the companies can be categorized to have a high KM maturity level despite their multiple use of KM tools. As influence factors the size of a company and an externally certified quality management were identified . To validate these findings an additional online survey was conducted with 79 participants. The results of this survey support the general statements above, but also show a significant relation with the KMM level and employees participation in knowledge management and the innovation success of a company compared to its main competitor. The paper contributes to the understanding of KM maturity and its influence factors and thus provides the foundation for further empirical research. Moreover, the finding s help organisations to position their KM efforts.

 

Keywords: Keywords: knowledge management, maturity levels, influence factors, success factors, case study research, online survey

 

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Journal Article

Human Capital and Creation of Reputation and Financial Performance  pp209-218

Isabel Olmedo-Cifuentes, Inocencia Martínez-León

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, Guest Edited Issue, Editor: Dr. Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Dr. David Cegarra-Leiva, pp171 - 253

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Abstract

Abstract: The aim of this paper is to show how managing human capital companies are able to enhance their corporate reputation and financial performance. In particular, this preliminary study analyses the impact of human capital on reputation perceived by employees and financial performance (by means of the return on capital employed ‑ROCE‑). Using a database of Spanish audit sector and applying an exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, three factors of human capital are obtained (Staff Quality, Staff Management and Staff Results) which have been related to the dimensions of employees views of reputation and ROCE through a path analysis. The results reveal that staff quality (firms with creative employees, who perform their best and think act ions through, and where there is no trouble if individuals left) has a significant and positive influence on all the dimensions of reputation. Staff management (firms with clear recruitment and succession training programs, upgrade employees skills and employees who give their all) has a significant and positive impact on resource management, ethics and media reputation. Staff results (employees are satisfied and they do not have to bring down to others level) have a positive and significant effect on business leadership, resource management, ethics and media reputation. No significant effects are found in when human capital factors and financial performance are linked as a consequence of the financial crisis. We also obtained unexpected results in the impact of reputation perceived by employees on financial performance. In any case, a practical implication for these results is that service companies which manage adequately their human capital can increase the employee views of corporate reputation , having the factor Staff Quality a double significant and positive influence on reputation than other two factors.

 

Keywords: Keywords: human capital factors, corporate reputation, financial performance, Spanish audit firms.

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 3, Linking Theory and Practice in Intellectual Capital / Oct 2017  pp145‑212

Editor: Dr. Ilídio Tomás Lopes, Dr. Rogério Marques Serrasqueiro

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Editorial

 

Keywords: value co-creation, intellectual capital, marketing, factor analysis, exploratory empirical analysis, consumer behaviour, Ghana, Sustainable Development, Fourth Mission, Social Well-Being, Indigenous Wisdom, Systemic Co-Creation, Community Intellectual Capital, Luhmannian Framework, Business performance, Intellectual capital, Human capital, Strategic Intent, Chief Knowledge Officers, strategic knowledge management, Intellectual Capital, reporting, measurements, actors, project sponsor, project leader, field study, Italy, intangibles, HRM, HR function, project-oriented organization, HR practitioners, HR business partner, Psychological capital, authentic leadership, trust, work well-being, efficacy, optimism, hope, resilience & Egyptian public organizations

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 3 / Jul 2007  pp257‑347

Editor: Charles Despres

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Keywords: architectures for knowledge management systems, business school, case based reasoning, communities of practice, customer relationship management, decision making, discovery query, expert, failure factors, frames, fuzzy logic, Heidegger, info-culture, info-structure, infrastructure, knowledge acquisition, knowledge adaptation, knowledge communication, knowledge dialogues, knowledge dissemination, knowledge generation, knowledge management practices, knowledge management systems, knowledge media, knowledge representation, knowledge transfer, knowledge utilization, knowledgebase, learning organization, ontology, organizational knowledge, popper, predicate logic, production rule, propositional logic, ranking semantic relations, relation robustness, relationship search, semantic associations search, semantic nets, semantic web, social capital, structuration theory, success factors of KM, validation

 

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