The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Journal Article

The Impact of Stories  pp53-64

Joanna Sinclair

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

Stories intrigue the field of Knowledge Management. Employing stories in both personnel and stakeholders communication is currently being recommended in several best practice guides on effective knowledge transfer and leadership communication. The aims of this article are to present further understanding of the impact of stories, and assess which kind of communication tasks stories are most apt for by considering stories as a medium. This allows for the examination of stories through two interlinked theories: Social Presence Theory and Media Richness Theory. These are found to be limited indicators of media effectiveness and it is suggested that elements of the theories should be broadened to make both theories useful for assessing core media effectiveness, although it is recommended that they be combined with other modes of evaluation to achieve thorough assessment of media impact.

 

Keywords: Stories, Storytelling, Communication, Social Presence Theory, Media Richness Theory, Knowledge Management

 

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Journal Article

Coaching From Afar: How Ubiquitous Information Technology Was Used to Develop a Successful Semi‑Virtual Team  pp65-74

Michael A. D'Eredita, Carol Chau

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp65 - 138

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Abstract

This study analyzed the communication between a national rowing team and their 'virtual coach' over a period of 18 months. An exploratory analysis of 1500+ emails provided insight into how the coach successfully leveraged ubiquitous information technology to build a high performance team. Zaccaro's (2002) framework of functional leadership and Weick and Robert's (1993) framework of collective mind were applied to understand the coach's approach for developing a non‑traditional semi‑ virtual team; the primary role of Coach was likened to that of "sense‑giver" given the charge of developing a "collective mind." This study works to illustrate how ubiquitous technology like e‑mails can be strategically used in the development of a high performing semi‑virtual team.

 

Keywords: Coach, Computer-mediated communication, Email, Virtual team

 

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Journal Article

Towards the Knowledge Economy: the Technological Innovation and Education Impact on the Value Creation Process  pp129-138

Ilídio Lopes, Maria do Rosário Martins, Miguel Nunes

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp65 - 138

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Abstract

Emerging as one of the most important corporate assets, there is evidence that, in some developed countries, the impact of knowledge capital in the GDP now surpasses the fixed capital. This paper uses quantitative data to broadly qualify the impact of the two main building blocks in the knowledge management integration process: information and communication technologies (ICT) and Education. The data analysis suggests that by providing efficient network platforms, knowledge can be captured, transformed and disseminated to individuals, groups and organisations. Investment in ICT seems to enable to connect people and support knowledge sharing and interpersonal interaction and therefore facilitate knowledge management processes and strategies. A case‑study of Portugal is used to illustrate the conclusions drawn.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Economy Knowledge Management Intangible Assets Information and Communication Technologies

 

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Journal Article

Action through a Learning History  pp49-58

Matti Koivuaho, Harri Laihonen

© Dec 2005 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

This paper offers a view of communication networks in which professionals are connected via knowledge flows and communication processes. The discussion focuses on a case study of software business processes in two small‑ size Finnish software companies. The paper has two objectives. First, it assesses the knowledge flow model as a tool that can be used for developing knowledge‑intensive services. Second, it offers a new way of seeing a software project from a communication and knowledge flow perspective.

 

Keywords: Knowledge flows, communication, software development, complexity thinking

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Sharing Practices: Analysis of a Global Scandinavian Consulting Company  pp109-116

Aurelie Arntzen Bechina, Thommy Bommen

© May 2007 Volume 4 Issue 2, ICICKM 2005, Editor: Charles Despres, pp91 - 216

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Abstract

In a knowledge economy landscape, successful global consulting firms are the ones putting focus on effectively and efficiently organising and managing the highly distributed diversified knowledge in the organisation. In order to sustain their competitive advantage, knowledge‑companies need to harness knowledge and to analyse knowledge sharing mechanisms and learning in the whole organisation. Knowledge sharing in global firms is a not only a cross‑department process but it should also take place within the same department. It is well recognised that the knowledge sharing mechanism is a highly complex process to put in place and to promote in the organisation. The primary goal of our research is to empirically investigate knowledge sharing and learning mechanisms within a global consulting company. The phenomenology discipline has guided our research methodology because it is the most appropriate approach for coping with the social complexity of management and business. Our research approach intends to make social sense from the knowledge sharing practices and observations conducted in order to understand how and what is shared.

 

Keywords: Knowledge sharing, learning organisation, phenomenology, information communication technology, culture, empirical knowledge sharing investigation

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Communication Problems between Experts and Decision Makers: an Overview and Classification  pp291-300

Martin J. Eppler

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, Editor: Charles Despres, pp257 - 347

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Abstract

In this article we examine the difficulties of knowledge communication among experts and decision makers. We begin by outlining where and how the communication of expertise from specialists to managers is crucial. We then review theoretical constructs that highlight knowledge transfer problems among experts and decision makers. On the basis of this review and using the results from six focus groups and thirty interviews with engineers and managers, we categorise these transfer challenges into five major groups. We distinguish among expert‑ and manager‑caused problems, reciprocal problems, problems due to the interaction situation and problems caused by the organisational context. These categories can be used to guide research on the micro‑aspects of knowledge transfer. Managers can use these problem categories to identify and reduce knowledge transfer barriers in their interaction with specialists.

 

Keywords: Knowledge transfer, knowledge communication, expert, decision making, knowledge media, knowledge dialogues

 

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Journal Article

Tacit Knowledge and Pedagogy at UK Universities: Challenges for Effective Management  pp61-74

Harvey Wright

© Jul 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

This paper hopes to persuade readers of current thinking around Knowledge Management that more emphasis should be placed on tacit knowledge in management and its education and how it might be better communicated to students within universities and in organisations in general. It reflects upon what appears to be the predominant attention being paid to explicit knowledge in the curriculum and pedagogy of UK Universities which offer courses entitled Knowledge Management, and that this may be at the expense of more tacit knowledge 'management' approaches.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, KM, tacit knowledge communication pedagogy curriculum didactic v constructionist university curriculum on knowledge management

 

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Journal Article

Mapping Social Networks among Crystallographers in South Africa  pp83-92

Gretchen Smith

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

The author adopts the premise that technological innovation, a critical factor in the long‑term economic growth of any country, can only function successfully within a social environment that provides relevant knowledge and information inputs into the innovative process. This is dependent on the efficient transfer and communication of knowledge and information which in turn relates to the amount and quality of interaction among scientists and technologists. These factors prompted a research project that used social network analysis techniques to investigate knowledge exchange and to map the knowledge network structure and communication practices of a group of scientists engaged with crystallographic research. This paper is based on this research project. The findings provide clear evidence of a strong social network structure among crystallographers in South Africa. A core nucleus of prominent, well connected and interrelated crystallographers constituted the central network of scientists that provided the main impetus to keep the network active. This eminent group of crystallographers were not only approached far more frequently for information and advice than any of their colleagues, but they also frequently initiated interpersonal and formal information communication acts. It was clear that this core group had achieved a standard of excellence in their work, were highly productive; very visible in their professional community and they generally played a pivotal role in the social network. They generally maintained a high professional profile in the crystallography community and within the general field of science, published profusely, and generally emerged as the archetypal sociometric stars in their field. It is thus clear that high productivity, professional involvement, innovation capacity and network connectivity are intricately interwoven. The crystallographers' work environment and concomitant work structure clearly affected network interaction. Working in a group structure stimulated network interaction, professional activity and productivity. A further benefit was that the leaders of these groups generally assumed gatekeeper roles that facilitated networking and ensured the importation and interpretation of new information and knowledge. It was clear that social networks operate more effectively in areas, such as Gauteng, where a sufficient number of scientists were amassed.

 

Keywords: knowledge transfer information communication social networks crystallographers scientists

 

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