The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Journal Article

Design of Sustainable Development: Intellectual Value of Large BRIC Companies and Factors of their Growth  pp535-558

Elvina Bayburina, Tatiana Golovko

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

Intellectual capital and its components can be regarded as the source for a company's organic growth to maintain sustainable development. Under the crisis conditions most of financial reserves are unavailable; the inner organizational efficiency by means of intellectual capital is a question of survival edge for most of the large companies of emerging markets. Multidirectional trends of the development of BRIC economies played a significant role in this discussion and the issue became more complicated under the pressure of the crisis. Notwithstanding BRIC countries can be regarded as leaders of so‑called developing economies. In terms of the downturn, however, the problem of the crisis should not be overstated: due to the cyclical changes of the world economy the stagnation will be rearranged by upturn sooner or later, however the accumulation of intellectual capital is the over time process. Intellectual capital of the company and its components can be regarded as "latent reserves" of the long term value growth. Intellectual capital is the "intangible safety‑cushion" and it can be used only by those companies who have created it years before and therefore have focused on sustainable development. The research of intellectual capital components and its role in value creation and building competitive advantage can remain an actual topic for empirical investigations, carried out in various countries and by different research centers. The intellectual value of a company is a part of the total value, created through the process of the intellectual components' accumulation. The main goal of this research is to evaluate by means of the panel data analysis the influence of particular components of intellectual capital on the intellectual value of BRIC companies. The process of intellectual capital accumulation is over time and it can be measured according to the long run panel data analysis not less than 5 years. The panel data analysis revealed that the human capital can be considered the key factor of the long‑term growth of BRIC companies of all industries. Employees and their competencies are this basis which is undervalued currently whereas most of financial assets lost trust and its value. However, specified directions of internal reserves audit and discussion of the Intellectual value on the emerging markets are very close to the fact that large BRIC companies depend a lot on the specific features of the infrastructure of each developing country. India and Russia are countries with the industrial potential, which is not fully realized, e.g. a lot of Russian companies are underinvested with unbalanced development strategies. Decrepit and out‑of‑date production facilities, in turn capital expenditures are a matter of great importance. The capital expenditures together with innovative managers and management techniques tend to be the leverage, which can push these companies towards intensive development, especially Russian companies.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital, human capital, stakeholders, growth drivers, sustainable competitive advantage, value, intellectual value, financial crisis, BRIC, developing countries, emerging markets

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital, trust, cultural traits and reputation in the Romanian education system  pp223-235

Marta-Christina Suciu, Luciana Picioruş, Cosmin Ionuţ Imbrişcă

© Jul 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, ECIC 2012, Editor: John Dumay, pp208 - 278

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Abstract

The contemporary approach to the concept of intellectual capital has transformed. The three components (human, relational and organizational capital) are not enough to reflect reality, as the static perspective was replaced by an integrative vision: i ntangible resources, actions and process that contribute to sustainable competitive advantage. However, this theoretical division provides solid ground for explaining the close bond between trust, cultural identity and cooperation, soft concepts, and in tellectual capital in knowledge‑based organizations. Therefore, we consider it is of high interest to identify the nature of the relational and organizational capital, and trust association. Is it first trust and then the two intellectual capital componen ts, or the other way around? Also, we can take one step further and consider the intellectual capital formation process and architectural scheme behind it. This paper aims firstly at offering a theoretical framework for the liaisons between the concepts p reviously mentioned and intellectual capital, underlying specific characteristics for the Romanian educational system, especially for tertiary /higher education. The second objective is to provide new research directions, comparing the findings with situa tions of other cultures, like Japan and USA. The research methodology comprises a thorough literature review of scientific studies and of the 2011 National Romanian Education Law. It focuses on the changes and challenges for the intellectual capital forma tion phase. Also, it involves an empirical investigation of an evaluation of the current intellectual capital formation route. The research instrument is a questionnaire, collecting information for both quantitative and qualitative research purposes. The findings of this paper seek to identify the structure and dynamics of the intellectual capital formation process in the Romanian higher education system. As well, we hope to lead to concrete solutions for improving general dynamics, and acknowledgment of trust, cooperation and cultural aspects as corner stones in education intellectual capital formation area.

 

Keywords: Intellectual Capital, trust, cooperation, education, organizational culture, human capital, sustainable competitive advantage.

 

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Journal Article

Business Innovative Environment as a Prerequisite for a Long‑run Competitive Advantage  pp34-45

Marta Christina Suciu, Cristina Andreea Florea

© Jan 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Special Edition for ECKM 2013, Editor: Monika Petraite, pp1 - 83

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Abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of innovation in businesses. It tries to illustrate the way companies could invest in lifelong learning focusing on the entrepreneurship education in order to support creativity and innova tion as prerequisite for a short‑run increase in their profits and mostly for a long‑run sustainable competitive advantage. In the first part of the paper, we will focus on companies. In some companies the manager is thinking how creativity could help. On e person may generate 10 ideas; conversely, 5 persons may generate 50 ideas. From those 50 ideas the manager can use at least 3 of them to increase the profit. This is how intellectual capital and creativity should be enhanced. Furthermore, it will influe nce the consumers buying renewed products in a more profitable way. The second part of the paper, we will highlight the importance of taking into account some best practices cases. Nowadays, with Internet banking, Euro Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) and credit cards, the final user has been granted options for the monetary transactions. People like consumers want their needs to be satisfied and this is one of the reasons why they have grown accustomed to demanding more and more from their banking servic es providers. In the last part of the paper, we will discuss about the creativity models and ways in which these models might influence the workers and the leaders to come up with new ideas, be creative and generate larger profit. From a methodological po int of view we applied both the quantitative method (surveys) and the qualitative one (in terms of focus‑groups & interviews).

 

Keywords: Keywords: business innovation, competitive advantage, innovation

 

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Journal Article

Resource‑Based View of Knowledge Management for Competitive Advantage  pp75-86

Leila A. Halawi, Jay E. Aronson, Richard V. McCarthy

© Oct 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp65 - 138

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Abstract

We are not only in a new millennium, but also in a new era: the knowledge era. Sustainable competitive advantage is dependent on building and exploiting core competencies. The resource‑based view (RBV) of the firm defines a strategic asset as one that is rare, valuable, imperfectly imitable and non‑substitutable. Knowledge is seen as a strategic asset with the potential to be a source of competitive advantage for an organization. In this paper, we provide a model that examines how and why knowledge management (KM) can be used to create competitive advantage from the RBV of the firm.

 

Keywords: Knowledge management, KM, knowledge management systems, KMS, resource-based view of the firm, RBV, sustained competitive advantage

 

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Journal Article

Aligning Knowledge Management with Competitive Strategy: A Framework  pp51-60

Paul Griffiths, Dan Remenyi

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

This paper presents a hybrid approach to understanding the knowledge management requirements for a knowledge intensive service organization. It proposes a strategy‑knowledge management alignment framework grounded in literature. The framework was constructed by studying four published case‑studies that tackle knowledge management at world class management consulting firms. The paper then applies the framework to two cases in the knowledge intensive services sector. The first case studies a young management consulting firm needing to formalize its knowledge management policies and processes. The second case studies the creation of an IT Outsourcing Services Division by a traditional telecommunications company that needs to expand its product offering to increase its opportunities for growth in a small market. The two case studies support the proposed framework and show that it can be used to obtain practical solutions in a business environment. One of the case studies also contributes to developing the case method in research by using the Socratic Dialogue as a means to collecting and analyzing evidence.

 

Keywords: Socratic dialogue, knowledge management, alignment, professional services, knowledge for competitive advantage

 

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Journal Article

Measuring the Effects of Knowledge Management Practices  pp161-170

Geoff Turner, Clemente Minonne

© Apr 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Ettore Bolisani, Enrico Scarso, pp1 - 180

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Abstract

Successful managers focus their attention on factors that are critical in establishing and maintaining an organisation's competitive edge. The knowledge and skill of employees is one of those factors and it requires proactive management attention. Conceptually, this is achieved through Knowledge Management, a term that has existed in the mainstream of business lexicon for quite some time. Despite this, there is the conspicuous absence of a common understanding of the term that frustrates many managers. Studies have clearly established that there are three interdependent and complementary pillars that support the concept of Knowledge Management. These are Organisational Learning Management (OLM), Organisational Knowledge Management (OKM) and Intellectual Capital Management (ICM). OLM, which has so far dominated both academic and practitioner debate, concerns itself with the problem of capturing, organising and retrieving explicit knowledge, or information, and has led to the simplistic misconception that Knowledge Management only involves the capture, or downloading, of the content of employees' minds. ICM is dominated by those particularly interested in defining key performance indicators that will measure the impact and the benefits of applying knowledge management practices. If management requires measurement this is an essential task but it can only be undertaken once an organisation has clearly established the strategy‑structure‑process parameters to ensure it accesses, creates and embeds the knowledge that it needs...the OKM pillar of knowledge management. This paper looks more deeply at this pillar and in particular the lack of a general integrative approach to enhancing organisational performance in this key strategic area. It considers to what extent such an approach may help an organisation more effectively manage its most relevant source of competitive advantage. With a greater awareness of the various factors allied to the managing and leveraging of human oriented and system oriented knowledge assets, some proposals are put forward to assist in developing or redefining an organisation's intellectual capital reporting models in search of a planning, control and performance measurement system that accounts for the management of an organisation's intellectual assets.

 

Keywords: organisational learning management, organisational knowledge management, intellectual capital management, performance indicators, competitive advantage

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 3 Issue 2 / Dec 2005  pp65‑138

Editor: Charles Despres

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Keywords: Absorptive capacity, Capabilities, Case study, Coach, Computer-mediated communication, Developing countries, Dynamic learning, Email, Information and Communication Technologies, Innovation, Intangible Assets, Intellectual Capital, Inter-organizational project team management, Knowledge creation and sharing, Knowledge Economy, Knowledge management (KM), Knowledge management systems (KMS), Knowledge transfer, Lotka-Volterra system, Organizational Learning, Organizational receptivity, Organizational Relation, Resource-based view of the firm (RBV), Sustained competitive advantage, Virtual team

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 5 / Dec 2009  pp535‑662

Editor: Kimiz Dalkir

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Editorial

The 9th ICICKM conference, held at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was well attended by participants representing over 20 different countries. The international flavor of the conference continues to ensure a diverse range of papers as well as opportunities for valuable networking. As with all ICICKM gatherings, researchers, practitioners and students of KM were brought together to discuss the KM crossroads we find ourselves at in the year 2009.

Some of the key issues that emerged from the two days included a consensus that KM has evolved so we no longer need to convince people it is needed. We now need now to know how to “do KM” – that is, how to implement knowledge management in organizations in a more informed manner. In particular, the need for more how‑to guides, detailed rules, good validated practices and an overall quasi‑standard approach to KM implementation were noted as priority needs for the KM community. In addition, particular guidance is required concerning the KM teams (who should do what?) and how best to address tacit knowledge. Other issues concerned the specific components that should be present in a KM workspace and how this workspace can address the needs of different users who need to accomplish different sorts of tasks

While participants felt that we still have to convince some senior managers, we now also need to better address how to align KM processes so as to not create overhead. For example, what is the impact of KM on other parts of the organization such as training and IT units? How can we change peoples’ behaviours and how they think about the work they do? What are the new skills/competencies needed? How can they acquire them? How to integrate KM into business processes? How to integrate KM roles within existing jobs?

The good news is that the discipline and practice of KM has evolved – the bad news is that we still have a long way to go. The focus is now on how to do KM well. Educators need to focus on student competencies, skills and roles and responsibilities. Researchers need to focus on more evidence‑based and theory‑based KM. Practitioners need to focus on feedback from users and best practices.

The collection of papers in this special conference edition address the multitude of issues we currently face, and will continue to face, in the future. There is an excellent mix of practical case studies, practical tools such as intellectual capital measurement models in addition to more conceptual and theoretical approaches to solving crucial KM problems.

 

Keywords: academic education, avatars, ba, BRIC, competitive intelligence, complexity of choice, creative destruction, decision-making, developing countries, discipline, emerging markets, experiment, financial crisis, group interaction, growth drivers, human capital, Indian economy, Information Technology sector, intangible assets, Intellectual capital, intellectual value, KM in interconnected power systems, Knowledge Active Forgetting (KAF), knowledge capital, knowledge management implementation, management support systems, measurement, methods of assessment, paradigm, SET KM model, stakeholders, strategy, sustainable competitive advantage, technology, theoretical framework, UK car manufacturing industry, undergraduate degree program in Turkey, unlearning, virtual environments

 

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