The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

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Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
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Journal Article

Value, Kaizen and Knowledge Management: Developing a Knowledge Management Strategy for Southampton Solent University  pp135-144

S J Rees, H Protheroe

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECKM 2008, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 198

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Abstract

The process of development of the strategic plan for Southampton Solent University offered a vehicle for the development of kaizen and knowledge management (KM) activities within the institution. The essential overlap between the methods offers clear benefits in the HE environment. In consideration of the aspects of KM and kaizen, various potential opportunities were identified as targets for improvement, and clarified by knowledge audit as to value and viability. The derived outcomes are listed along with some of the principal factors and perceived barriers in the practical implementation of the outcomes. Knowledge audit applied here focused on the identification of where value arises within the business. Resource constraints and the practicalities of a people‑centred system limit the permissible rate of innovation, so precise focus on the areas of business activity of most significance to the mission and client base is crucial. The fundamental question of whether such a strategy should be developed as a separate strand or embedded into existing strategies is discussed. In practice, Solent has chosen to embed, principally for reasons of maintenance of ownership and commitment. Confidence in the process has been built through prior success with trialled activities around retention, where an activity‑ based pedagogic framework was adopted to address issues with an access course. Other areas of early intervention include the development and reengineering of recruitment and admissions processes, and the development of activities and pedagogy based on the virtual learning environment as exemplars of the importance of cyclical feedback in continuous improvement. The inherent complexity of processes running across the university as an organisation offers opportunities for benefits from the through‑process approach implicit in kaizen. The business value of the institution is in the skills of its employees and its deployed intellectual property, and thus the importance of the enhancement of both tangible assets and intangible processes is critical to future success.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, kaizen, knowledge audit, knowledge strategy, knowledge management in higher education, strategy development

 

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Journal Article

Mobile Knowledge Tool‑kit to Create a Paradigm Shift in Higher Education  pp255-260

Nader Nada, Mohamed Kholief, Shehab Tawfik, Noha Metwally

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

One of the main objective of educators is to identifying inspiring and interactive approach to learning, and to encourage students to be more receptive and co‑operative in the classroom. To help educators in achieving these goals we employed constructivist epistemology and constructivist cognitive psychology, together with the use of Mind Maps and Mobile Knowledge (M‑K) Toolkit. The toolkit can serve as the foundation for a new kind of integration of Internet resources and all classroom, laboratory, field experiences, and when used with "expert skeletal" Mind Maps to scaffold learning. It is our thesis that good theory‑based use of the appropriate technology can increase the benefits of using Mind Maps in education and lead to dramatically improved education. In this paper we first explored the Mind Maps Concept, then we presented and explained the advantages of M‑K toolkit and how this can support mind mapping and integration of a whole array of learning experiences. In the last section we presented two case studies to provide the evidence of how the M‑K toolkit and Mind Maps can lead to education paradigm shift and enhance the outcome of the learning experience in higher education.

 

Keywords: mind map, higher education, mobile knowledge, m-k toolkit

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Sharing in Academic Institutions: a Study of Multimedia University Malaysia  pp313-324

Ming-YuCheng

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp297 - 397

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Abstract

Recent developments have witnessed the emergence of a new economy where knowledge has become a valuable resource and asset. The dynamism of the new economy requires us to not only quickly create knowledge, but also to acquire and apply knowledge quickly. One possible way to do so is to share our knowledge effectively. Knowledge sharing is envisaged as a natural activity of the academic institutions as the number of seminars, conferences and publications by academics is far exceeding any other profession, signifying the eagerness of academics to share knowledge. However, instead of knowledge sharing, "knowledge hoarding" could be more prevalent in academic institutions. This paper examines knowledge sharing behavior among academics in a private university in Malaysia. Factors affecting the willingness to share knowledge, broadly classified as organizational, individual and technology factors, are examined. The overall findings revealed that incentive systems and personal expectation are the two key factors in driving academics to engage in knowledge sharing activity. "Forced" participation is not an effective policy in cultivating sharing behavior among academics.

 

Keywords: knowledge sharing, knowledge management, higher education institution, sharer model

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management Discipline: Test for an Undergraduate Program in Turkey  pp627-636

Mustafa Sagsan

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

This study aims to explain the theoretical aspect of KM in order to construct a new undergraduate program. Knowledge management as a discipline plays a crucial role at the undergraduate level in universities. Firstly, it is needed to create a common terminology from which the scholars can establish programs. Secondly, a set of sciences are needed. These two stages will allow us to redefine the knowledge management discipline from an interdisciplinary perspective that is based on four fundamental paradigms: (1) technological, (2) socio technical, (3) inter intra organizational and (4) humanist paradigm. This will allow us to have an opportunity to improve the common terms, which we can establish the knowledge management undergraduate programs from. In addition, the practical perspective of this study will be tested in Turkish universities, which have knowledge management undergraduate programs, which will enable us to suggest a new sample for how knowledge management undergraduate degree programs should successfully be constructed in Turkey.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management, paradigm, discipline, academic education, undergraduate degree program in Turkey

 

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Journal Article

Activities and Outputs of a Clinical Faculty: an Intellectual Capital Concept Map  pp647-662

Belinda Wilkinson, Clare Beghtol, Dante Morra

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

The concept of intellectual capital (IC) was used to evaluate the activities and outputs of a university medical department. First, a conceptual framework was developed to highlight the importance of various activities as dimensions of IC. The conceptualization of IC was further developed using concept mapping (CM). The authors first considered the problem of what comprises IC and determined whether previous researchers have defined IC in terms of activities. The importance of IC, its definition as an organizational resource and activity, the link between IC and value creation and extraction activities, and the problem of the associated composition of IC taken from existing European guidelines and regulations were discussed. To begin to construct a classification of activities and outputs, the information currently employed for assessing the research, education, and related academic activities and outputs of faculty members were analyzed. Four different evaluation approaches were compared to identify the activities and outputs of a university medical department, and to consolidate the information being collected for evaluation of universities, university‑affiliated research institutes, researchers within universities, and faculty within university departments into an inclusive set of activities and outputs. These were two forms of IC reporting, one used in Austrian universities and the other at a university‑affiliated Swedish research institute together with two other long‑established means of assessing faculty, the Research Assessment Exercise in the UK, and the faculty evaluation and promotion requirements at the University of Toronto in Canada. Education administrators' perceptions were solicited to derive the IC used in a research faculty of a Canadian university. The results indicate that IC can be understood in terms of both activities and outputs. Clinical faculty can be expected to engage in research and its supervision, education, obtaining qualifications, clinical and professional practice, and service. Within these categories, individual activities and outputs were not considered to be of equal importance or impact. Among seventy activities and outputs, articles in internationally refereed journals was ranked as most important, whereas teaching awards was ranked as having the most impact by the most participants. This study extends existing research by using CM to generate a conceptual framework of IC for a department of medicine.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital, guidelines, concept mapping, university medical department, clinical faculty, education administrators

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital, trust, cultural traits and reputation in the Romanian education system  pp223-235

Marta-Christina Suciu, Luciana Picioruş, Cosmin Ionuţ Imbrişcă

© Jul 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, ECIC 2012, Editor: John Dumay, pp208 - 278

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Abstract

The contemporary approach to the concept of intellectual capital has transformed. The three components (human, relational and organizational capital) are not enough to reflect reality, as the static perspective was replaced by an integrative vision: i ntangible resources, actions and process that contribute to sustainable competitive advantage. However, this theoretical division provides solid ground for explaining the close bond between trust, cultural identity and cooperation, soft concepts, and in tellectual capital in knowledge‑based organizations. Therefore, we consider it is of high interest to identify the nature of the relational and organizational capital, and trust association. Is it first trust and then the two intellectual capital componen ts, or the other way around? Also, we can take one step further and consider the intellectual capital formation process and architectural scheme behind it. This paper aims firstly at offering a theoretical framework for the liaisons between the concepts p reviously mentioned and intellectual capital, underlying specific characteristics for the Romanian educational system, especially for tertiary /higher education. The second objective is to provide new research directions, comparing the findings with situa tions of other cultures, like Japan and USA. The research methodology comprises a thorough literature review of scientific studies and of the 2011 National Romanian Education Law. It focuses on the changes and challenges for the intellectual capital forma tion phase. Also, it involves an empirical investigation of an evaluation of the current intellectual capital formation route. The research instrument is a questionnaire, collecting information for both quantitative and qualitative research purposes. The findings of this paper seek to identify the structure and dynamics of the intellectual capital formation process in the Romanian higher education system. As well, we hope to lead to concrete solutions for improving general dynamics, and acknowledgment of trust, cooperation and cultural aspects as corner stones in education intellectual capital formation area.

 

Keywords: Intellectual Capital, trust, cooperation, education, organizational culture, human capital, sustainable competitive advantage.

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital Management as Part of Knowledge Management Initiatives at Institutions of Higher Learning  pp181-190

Andrew Kok

© May 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ICICKM 2006, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp131 - 254

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Abstract

Aspects such as human capital, structural capital and customer capital are important variables of the whole intellectual capital management programme, which forms part of the knowledge management initiatives of institutes of higher learning. The skills and expertise of university staff as part of its human capital are discussed. Structural capital will encompass aspects such as the role of innovation and intellectual property rights. Customer capital of the university and the knowledge of stakeholders in the field of tertiary education are becoming more important. The results of a study done at a South African university are used to indicate which of these aspects needs to be measured and a new framework for measurement and management of IC is discussed.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, intellectual capital management, higher education

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management and Higher Education: A UK Case Study  pp11-26

Desireé Joy Cranfield, John Taylor

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

This paper presents the initial findings of a case study conducted at seven Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom. The Case Study utilizes Stankosky's Knowledge Management (KM) pillars to enterprise learning — leadership, organization, technology and learning — as a lens to investigate and understand Knowledge Management practices and perceptions within Higher Education Institutions, looking at challenges of implementation within this sector. Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom are very complex institutions, with diverse backgrounds, history, culture, resources and missions. The University presents itself in today's knowledge economy with a dichotomy of priorities, one which aims to provide quality teaching and research activity, and the other, to ensure effective and efficient management and administration within an increasingly competitive market. Being a service, non‑profit organization ensures that the values of scholarship remain a very important aspect of its mission; yet, the external environment within which HEIs conduct their business today is rapidly changing, forcing HEIs to reflect on how they do 'business' given the external pressures they face. This case study uses the Grounded Theory methodology to begin to unpack the issues related to the implementation of Knowledge Management within this context. It focuses on two aspects of the case study — the characteristics of universities and academics that hinder or promote the implementation of KM, and the perceptions of Knowledge Management and its challenges for implementation within the HEI sector. Initial findings are presented.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, UK case study, grounded theory, higher education

 

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