The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
Become a Reviewer for EJKM click here
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

For info on the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), click here
Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
 

Journal Article

Towards Understanding KM Practices in the Academic Environment: The Shoemaker's Paradox  pp67-74

Gary R Oliver

© Nov 2003 Volume 1 Issue 2, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 226

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

One area of omission in knowledge intensive studies is within higher educationresearch where there is the virtuous circle of teaching, research and consulting professional work. Using a model adapted from Handzic (2001) and a survey modified from Arthur Andersen (1998) the perceived importance and perceived implementation to faculty members is explored. The discrepancy between results of the two forced the researchers to confront their own biases. Guidance was sought from ethnographic accounts which allowed allows the researcher to state personal feelings in a confessional accompaniment to the formal findings.

 

Keywords: Knowledge management processes, Organisational environment, Knowledge management technologies Confessional ethnography

 

Share |

Journal Article

Transformational and Transactional Leadership Predictors of the 'Stimulant' Determinants to Creativity in Organisational Work Environments  pp23-34

John D. Politis

© Apr 2005 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 44

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between the leadership dimensions associated with Bass's (1985) model, and the 'stimulant' and 'obstacle' determinants of the work environment for creativity. There are three major findings in this research. First, the relationship between transformational and transactional leadership and the 'stimulant' determinants of the work environment for creativity is significant and positive. Second, the 'obstacle' determinants of the work environment for creativity are negatively related with both transactional and transformational leadership. Finally, transformational leadership is more strongly correlated than transactional leadership with the 'stimulant' determinants of the work environment for creativity. Thus, transformational leadership is an increasingly important aspect in today's organisations in creating a corporate culture and the work environment that stimulates employees' creativity and innovation.

 

Keywords: creative work environment, innovation, knowledge management, organisational creativity, transformational and transactional leadership

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Effect of Knowledge Management Context on Knowledge Management Practices: an Empirical Investigation  pp117-128

Brian Detlor, Umar Ruhi, Ofir Turel, Pierrette Bergeron, Chun Wei Choo, Lorna Heaton, Scott Paquette

© Apr 2006 Volume 4 Issue 2, ICICKM 2005, Editor: Charles Despres, pp91 - 216

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper presents recent research findings on the effects of organizational knowledge management (KM) context on KM practices. Data were collected at a large Canadian law firm via a Web‑based survey instrument from over 400 participants comprising professional and support staff working in various office locations. The purpose of the study was to gain insight on the antecedents of knowledge management behaviors in organizations. A theoretical model explicating the impact of an organization's KM environment on both organizational and individual KM behaviors was developed and tested using structural equation modeling techniques. The moderating effects of age, biological sex, job category, and years spent in the organization were also examined. Results indicate that an organization's knowledge management environment impacts on both organizational as well as personal knowledge management behaviors. Furthermore, we show that organizational KM behavior also influences personal KM behavior, thus acting as a mediator between the overarching organizational knowledge management policies and practices and the employees' individual practices. Based on this empirical evidence, recommendations are suggested for organizations wishing to institutionalize knowledge management initiatives in their firms.

 

Keywords: Knowledge management behaviour, knowledge management practices, knowledge management context, knowledge management environment, knowledge sharing, corporate strategy

 

Share |

Journal Article

A Study on the Influence of Intellectual Capital and Intellectual Capital Complementarity on Global Initiatives  pp154-163

Ya-Hui Ling

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 2, ICICKM 2011, Editor: Vincent Ribière, pp110 - 207

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

: A main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of intellectual capital and intellectual capital complementarity on a firm’s global initiatives. Sample was selected with a type of purposive sampling. The selection criteria were that companies had to locate in Taiwan, but competing globally. Altogether 324 firms took part in the study. Structural Equation Modelling technique was used in the data analysis. Based on the analyses results, some implications are provided. Firstly, the importance of intellectual capital is again highlighted. It is confirmed that intellectual capital does enhance a firm’s global initiatives. Secondly, some moderating effects of business environment are found between intellectual capital and global initiatives. Thirdly, the important role of intellectual capital complementarity is identified. It is found that intellectual capital complementarity has positive effect on global initiatives in both high dynamic and low dynamic contexts. As a result, the value of intellectual capital components can mostly be actualized only in terms of their dynamic interrelationships and conjoint interaction.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital, global initiatives, environment, complementarity, SEM

 

Share |

Journal Article

Knowledge Work Practices in Global Software Development  pp347-356

Gabriela Avram

© Jan 2008 Volume 5 Issue 4, Editor: Charles Despres, pp347 - 550

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper is an exploration of knowledge work practices in a distributed software development setting. The author has undertaken an empirical study in the Irish subsidiary of a multinational company over a 16‑month period. Our methods were inspired by ethnography; by spending an extended period of time with a software development team working on a specific project, we had the opportunity to observe real work practices in a real work setting in the specific circumstances of distributed work. The purpose of the current study is to highlight the ways in which technical and social factors are inextricably entwined in distributed work settings.

 

Keywords: collaboration, work practices, distributed work environments, global software development, knowledge work, mutual knowledge, transactive memory

 

Share |

Journal Article

An Experimental Comparison of 3D Virtual Environments and Text Chat as Collaboration Tools  pp637-646

Andreas Schmeil, Martin Eppler, Mattia Gubler

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

A key prerequisite for effective team collaboration concerns the team members' knowledge about their different backgrounds, skills and experiences. While face‑to‑face interaction provides multiple opportunities for learning about these vital personal elements informally, a computer‑mediated communication setting may make knowledge sharing about team members and their specific backgrounds more difficult. This knowledge sharing, however, may be crucial and should thus be supported also in remote settings. In this paper, we present the design and results of a controlled experiment in which participants needed to share information and make decisions with team members online, in a simulated project kick‑off meeting. Five experimental groups collaborated in a three‑dimensional Virtual Environment (3D CVE), five control groups in text chat sessions. Opposing these two media, we were able to extrapolate the essential characteristics of 3D CVE. The experiment yields first results proving improved retention when collaborating with avatars in 3D environments and provides insights about the value of this media as a collaboration tool.

 

Keywords: avatars, virtual environments, experiment, group interaction, decision-making

 

Share |

Journal Article

IC and Knowledge Formation by Hidden Structures … Long Term Costs of new Technology and Participative Design  pp221-235

Klaus Bruno Schebesch

© Sep 2011 Volume 9 Issue 3, ECIC 2011, Editor: Geoff Turner and Clemente Minonne, pp181 - 295

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Many innovative businesses formed around energy or bio‑related activities, for instance, are often the result of collective action of organisations involved in many‑sided markets, which can be found in and around focusing environments such as business incubators or tech¬no¬logy centres. Within such environments, group interests beyond those of single producers and their immediate clients exist and interfere. Rather generically, important economic outcomes of innovations are se¬quen¬ces of cost reduc¬¬tion events, the pace of which is influenced by technology and networking alike. Moreover, new products or technologies are producing long term costs difficult to anticipate, which eventually, in response to private and public awareness and knowledge formation, will have to be inter¬nalized. More traditional industries like textiles rely in general on conservative business models and use new technology in rather restricted ways. Product design is fashion orien¬ted and there¬fore predominantly “artistic” in nature, distribution channels are directed towards out¬lets facilitating physical contact of clients with the produce. New technology enters main¬ly via more mechanized production cycles for a given set of narrowly defined final products. The formation of Intellectual Capital (IC) in such industries is a slow. The presence of low creativity products indicates underutilization of both new product concepts and tech¬nological possi¬bilities. Participative design procedures for new product concepts using appropriate eCommerce features point here towards a way out. Such features include well adapted recommender systems based on trust creation and opinion formation. We propose to model the effects of these long term costs of new technology and the possibly complementary effects of participative design procedures by economic agents acting within specific adaptable neighbourhoods and by formation of some trust related assets. Thereafter, the influ¬ence exerted between firms is increasing in firm similarity, in the degree of product complementarity, and it also depends on (mutual) trust relations. A sustainable innovation is more expensive than a regular one but it may lead to long term benefits and to durable competitive advantage, espe¬cially if many firms from the network collude. The associated opinion formation process which leads to sustainable innovation may be viewed as a collec¬tive cognitive process resem¬bling that of branding and re‑branding. A similar trust‑based opinion formation is also regarded as part of a pro¬ce¬dure for assessing the acceptance of many new or parallel product concepts as they derive from Participative design procedures anticipating future product uses. Stylized dynamic models, which entail an opinion formation process, can in turn be identified with different levels of sustainability commitment by innovating and imitating firms within a dynamic multi‑firm setting. Such models tend to display the statistical behaviour of some aggregates known to occur in empirical innovative processes.

 

Keywords: IC and learning, long term environmental costs, opinion and trust formation, participative design and innovation networks, sustainability, recommender systems

 

Share |

Journal Article

Use and Acceptance of Learning Platforms Within Universities  pp24-35

Boyka Simeonova et al

© Jan 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Special Edition for ECKM 2013, Editor: Monika Petraite, pp1 - 87

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are learning platforms within universities aiming to enhance students learning. In order to determine the success of VLE adoption in universities it is essential to identify the factors which influence the students acceptance and use of VLE systems and potentially to develop a theoretical model which can predict the influence of these factors on the students' learning activities. We are adopting the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTA UT) model developed by Venkatesh et al. (2003) to identify and test the underlying factors influencing VLE acceptance and use. UTAUT is a relatively new and untested model especially within cross‑cultural settings in the context of Higher Education (S traub, 2009). The adoption of UTAUT to explore the use and acceptance of technology … and particularly VLEs … in educational settings is somehow limited. We posit that this model is appropriate for this context and we position our research to fill these gaps. We are testing the model in three business schools in universities in two different countries. We are aiming to test the model within UK and Russian educational settings using factor analysis by deploying Venkatesh et al.s (2003) questionnaire am ong students. If UTAUT has been used in various settings, its adoption appears to lack rigour in explaining the significance of the identified factors which can shape acceptance and use. The results would help enhancing and hopefully strengthening the the ory by testing the factors loadings and their impact on VLE acceptance and use within educational settings to enhance knowledge creation, sharing, mapping and collaboration. The results demonstrate the validity of the UTAUT model in different cultural se ttings as well as the deeper cultural differences in the perceptions of use and acceptance of VLEs which highlight the crucial role of culture on technology adoption.

 

Keywords: Keywords: UTAUT, technology acceptance, virtual learning environments, higher education

 

Share |