The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

The Role of Knowledge Flow in the Thai GUIN Version of the Triple Helix Model  pp287-296

Lugkana Worasinchai

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

The "triple helix" model is considered as being a spiral model of innovation contributing to the country and regional improvement by fostering interactions between academic, industry and government. This model highlights the ties between the three parties at different stages in the process of knowledge capitalization and flow. Although, this model has proven to be effective in some countries, some questions remain regarding its effective implementation in Thailand. This paper presents an adapted version of the helix model that could contribute to development of ties among stakeholders through strategic alliances. The success key factors leading to an economic development mission by universities are as well discussed.

 

Keywords: triple helix model, knowledge capitalization, Thailand, research network, innovation, university- industry interaction, framework G-U-I-N

 

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Journal Article

What is the Value of Knowledge Management Practices?  pp567-574

Fahmi Ibrahim, Vivien Reid

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

What are the appropriate sources from which to draw evidence about Knowledge Management (KM) and its added value to organisations? This paper attempts to answer this question, first examining the literature for approaches to measuring KM from the perspective of Intellectual Capital (IC) theory. However, findings indicated that many measurement methods or frameworks have limitations. Following the literature review, the researchers then approached KM practitioners, within the UK car manufacturing industry, and undertook in‑depth interviews in an attempt to understand how these organisations value their KM practices. The UK car manufacturing industry was selected because little previous research has been undertaken in this context, most previous studies having concentrated mainly on service industries. It was discovered that, in most of the organisations studied, the link between KM, business benefits and bottom line is almost axiomatic, especially amongst those who are enthusiastic advocates of KM. Drawing on the evidence from the in‑depth interviews, the paper concludes that there is an absence of linking mechanisms between value and measurement. This is due to the differences between the concept of a value and measurement approach and the importance of these two concepts to justify the outcome of KM practices. Recommendations are made through the development of a theoretical framework that includes both objective and subjective dimensions of KM measurement strategy.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, intellectual capital, uk car manufacturing industry, theoretical framework, value, measurement

 

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Journal Article

The Global Knowledge Management Framework: Towards a Theory for Knowledge Management in Globally Distributed Settings  pp93-109

Jan Pawlowski, Markus Bick

© Jan 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECKM 2011, Editor: Franz Lehner, pp1 - 109

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Abstract

Our paper introduces the Global Knowledge Management Framework (GKMF) which describes components and influence factors of knowledge management in globally distributed settings. The framework identifies the key aspects when designing knowledge management p

 

Keywords: global knowledge management, internationalization, global knowledge management framework, knowledge management processes, culture, knowledge management theory, process management

 

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Journal Article

Contextual Adaptive Knowledge Visualization Environments  pp1-14

Xiaoyan Bai, David White, David Sundaram

© Jan 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECKM 2011, Editor: Franz Lehner, pp1 - 109

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Abstract

As an essential component of knowledge management systems, visualizations assist in creating, transferring and sharing knowledge in a wide range of contexts where knowledge workers need to explore, manage and get insights from tremendous volumes of data. Knowledge visualization context may incorporate any information in regard to the decisional problem context within which visualizations are applied, the visualization profiles of knowledge workers as well as their intended purposes. Due to the inherent dynamic nature, these contextual factors may cause the changing visualization requirements and difficulties in maintaining the effectiveness of a knowledge visualization when contextual changes occur. To address the contextual complexities, visualization systems to support knowledge management need to provide flexible support for the creation, manipulation, transformation and improvement of visualization solutions. Furthermore, they should be able to sense, analyze and respond to the contextual changes so as to support in maintaining the effectiveness of the solutions. In addition, they need to possess the capability to mediate between the problem and the knowledge workers through provision of action and presentation languages. However, many visualization systems tend to provide weak support for fulfilling these system requirements. They do not provide adequate flexibility for adapting the visualizations to fit different knowledge visualization contexts. This motivated us to propose and implement a flexible knowledge visualization system for better aiding knowledge creation, transfer and sharing, namely, Contextual Adaptive Visualization Environment (CAVE). CAVE provides flexible support for (1) sensing and being aware of changes in the problem, purpose and/or knowledge worker contexts, (2) interpreting the changes through relevant analysis and (3) responding to the changes through appropriate re‑design and re‑modelling of visual compositions to address the problem. In order to fulfil the requirements posed above, we developed and proposed conceptual models and frameworks which are further elucidated through system‑oriented architectures and implementations.

 

Keywords: knowledge visualization, knowledge visualization context, knowledge creation and sharing, CAVE model, CAVE framework, and CAVE implementation

 

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Journal Article

The Need for a Robust Knowledge Assessment Framework: Discussion and Findings from an Exploratory Case Study  pp93-106

Jamie O’Brien

© Jan 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, ECKM 2012, Editor: Dr Juan Gabriel Cegarra and Dr María Eugenia Sánchez, pp1 - 115

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Abstract

The primary aim of this paper is to highlight the need for a robust Knowledge Assessment Framework (KAF). The development of a KAF is important for organisations for three reasons. Firstly, the use of knowledge assessment allows firms to pinpoint knowledge gaps. Secondly, it allows firms to manage knowledge more effectively. Thirdly, it gives organisations a diagnostic tool with which to gauge their knowledge base. The effective management of knowledge can be considered a competency that enables a greater level of service to be extracted from other resources within the organisation. The results of this study highlight several points for organisations interested in understanding their knowledge base. The analysis moved beyond simply looking at the framework itself and offers some interesting insights.

 

Keywords: knowledge, knowledge management, knowledge assessment framework, case study

 

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Journal Article

A Holistic View of the Knowledge Life Cycle: The Knowledge Management Cycle (KMC) Model  pp85-97

Max Evans, Kimiz Dalkir, Catalin Bidian

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, Special Edition for ICICKM 2013, Editor: Annie Green, pp83 - 154

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Abstract

Abstract: As more companies implement knowledge management (KM), they require a practical and coherent strategy and practice anchored in a valid and comprehensive KM life cycle model or framework. Using a knowledge‑based view, this paper aims to improve how firms conceptualize, strategize, and manage organizational knowledge. The paper opens with an analysis of organizational knowledge and knowledge assets. Appropriate conceptualization and partitioning of knowledge is required since the cost, benefit, and imitability of knowledge assets largely depend on their form. Subsequently, the paper provides a historical and chronological overview of some of the most influential KM life cycle models, based on their scholarly adoption and frequency of use by prac titioners. Each represents an advance in the thinking concerning the KM life cycle and introduces valuable new elements to be considered in understanding how organizational knowledge is processed throughout its useful lifespan. Life cycle models examined include Wiig (1993), Meyer and Zack (1999), Bukowitz and Williams (1999), and McElroy (2003). Dalkirs (2005) integrated life cycle model and Heisigs (2009) examination of 160 KM frameworks are also reviewed for their contribution. Building o n these models and prior work by Evans and Ali (2013), the Knowledge Management Cycle (KMC) model is proposed. Finally, sample KM initiatives, activities, and technologies are mapped to the seven non‑sequential KMC model phases (i.e., identify, store , share, use, learn, improve, and create) to illustrate its practical use. The main contribution of the KMC model is that it provides a holistic view of the knowledge life cycle, by building on previous life cycles models and Heisigs (2009) analysis o f KM frameworks. It further extends previous models by including different knowledge forms, integrating the notion of second order or double loop learning, and associating some facilitating initiatives and technologies for each of its phases.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Knowledge management, KM life cycle, KM framework, initiatives, technology, knowledge, knowledge assets, tacit, codified, encapsulated

 

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Journal Article

A Knowledge Management Framework for Sustainable Rural Development: The case of Gilgit‑Baltistan, Pakistan  pp104-117

Liaqut Ali, Anders Avdic

© Aug 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, Editor: Ken Grant, pp101 - 171

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Abstract

Abstract: Some 50% of the people in the world live in rural areas, often under harsh conditions and in poverty. The need for knowledge of how to improve living conditions is well documented. In response to this need, new knowledge of how to improve living conditions in rural areas and elsewhere is continuously being developed by researchers and practitioners around the world. People in rural areas, in particular, would certainly benefit from being able to share relevant knowledge with each other, as well as with stakeholders (e.g. researchers) and other organizations (e.g. NGOs). Central to knowledge management is the idea of knowledge sharing. This study is based on the assumption that knowledge management can support sustainable development in rural and remote regions. It aims to present a framework for knowledge management in sustainable rural development, and an inventory of existing frameworks for that. The study is interpretive, with interviews as the primary source for the inventory of stakehol ders, knowledge categories and Information and Communications Technology (ICT) infrastructure. For the inventory of frameworks, a literature study was carried out. The result is a categorization of the stakeholders who act as producers and beneficiaries of explicit and indigenous development knowledge. Stakeholders are local government, local population, academia, NGOs, civil society and donor agencies. Furthermore, the study presents a categorization of the development knowledge produced by the stakeho lders together with specifications for the existing ICT infrastructure. Rural development categories found are research, funding, agriculture, ICT, gender, institutional development, local infrastructure development, and marketing & enterprise. Finally, a compiled framework is presented, and it is based on ten existing frameworks for rural development that were found in the literature study, and the empirical findings of the Gilgit‑Baltistan case. Our proposed framework is divided in four levels where lev el one consists of the identified stakeholders, le

 

Keywords: Keywords: sustainability, rural development, remote regions, framework, stakeholder, indigenous knowledge, requirement analysis, knowledge society

 

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Journal Article

Unitas: Towards a Holistic Understanding of Knowledge in Organisations … A Case Based Analysis  pp143-155

Dr. Rebecca Purcell, Dr. Jamie OBrien

© Aug 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, Editor: Ken Grant, pp101 - 171

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Abstract

The aim of the paper is to present a holistic framework of knowledge in organizations. The language of duality and opposites dominates much of the knowledge based literature, whereby knowledge and knowing in organizations are framed as an either/ or dis cussion (Schultze and Stabell, 2004). This paper questions the usefulness of continued proliferation of such an approach, given the maturing nature of the field of knowledge management, and the ever increasing implementation of knowledge management acti vities by firms. The paper calls for a more unified interpretation of knowledge in organisations, which reflects the reality of the complex nature of knowledge and knowledge across the multiple levels of the firm. Hence the paper seeks to make a contribu tion by carrying out a multi case study of knowledge and knowing in organisations at multiple levels of analysis (that is at the individual, group and organizational level), with a view to supporting a unified framework on knowledge in organisations. Th e resulting framework is titled, Unitas, a conceptual framework on knowledge in organisations. The research was carried out in four case firms, across two industries, these beingmedical devices and pharmaceuticals. Fifty nine interviews were conducted, in tandem with documentation analysis, and observations. The resulting findings were analyzed using an interpretivist position. The paper concludes that multiple perspectives on organisational knowledge and knowledge activity are evident in the case organis ations at three main levels of analysis, namely the individual, group and organizational levels. The Unitas framework presents four knowledge positions which are all concurrently active in organizations. The main contribution of the Unitas framework on or ganisational knowledge is that it provides a holistic interpretation of knowledge and knowing activity in organizations.

 

Keywords: Organisational Knowledge, Knowledge Based View: Knowledge Strategy, Knowledge Framework, Case Analysis

 

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