The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

Value, Kaizen and Knowledge Management: Developing a Knowledge Management Strategy for Southampton Solent University  pp135-144

S J Rees, H Protheroe

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECKM 2008, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 198

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Abstract

The process of development of the strategic plan for Southampton Solent University offered a vehicle for the development of kaizen and knowledge management (KM) activities within the institution. The essential overlap between the methods offers clear benefits in the HE environment. In consideration of the aspects of KM and kaizen, various potential opportunities were identified as targets for improvement, and clarified by knowledge audit as to value and viability. The derived outcomes are listed along with some of the principal factors and perceived barriers in the practical implementation of the outcomes. Knowledge audit applied here focused on the identification of where value arises within the business. Resource constraints and the practicalities of a people‑centred system limit the permissible rate of innovation, so precise focus on the areas of business activity of most significance to the mission and client base is crucial. The fundamental question of whether such a strategy should be developed as a separate strand or embedded into existing strategies is discussed. In practice, Solent has chosen to embed, principally for reasons of maintenance of ownership and commitment. Confidence in the process has been built through prior success with trialled activities around retention, where an activity‑ based pedagogic framework was adopted to address issues with an access course. Other areas of early intervention include the development and reengineering of recruitment and admissions processes, and the development of activities and pedagogy based on the virtual learning environment as exemplars of the importance of cyclical feedback in continuous improvement. The inherent complexity of processes running across the university as an organisation offers opportunities for benefits from the through‑process approach implicit in kaizen. The business value of the institution is in the skills of its employees and its deployed intellectual property, and thus the importance of the enhancement of both tangible assets and intangible processes is critical to future success.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, kaizen, knowledge audit, knowledge strategy, knowledge management in higher education, strategy development

 

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Journal Article

Mobile Knowledge Tool‑kit to Create a Paradigm Shift in Higher Education  pp255-260

Nader Nada, Mohamed Kholief, Shehab Tawfik, Noha Metwally

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

One of the main objective of educators is to identifying inspiring and interactive approach to learning, and to encourage students to be more receptive and co‑operative in the classroom. To help educators in achieving these goals we employed constructivist epistemology and constructivist cognitive psychology, together with the use of Mind Maps and Mobile Knowledge (M‑K) Toolkit. The toolkit can serve as the foundation for a new kind of integration of Internet resources and all classroom, laboratory, field experiences, and when used with "expert skeletal" Mind Maps to scaffold learning. It is our thesis that good theory‑based use of the appropriate technology can increase the benefits of using Mind Maps in education and lead to dramatically improved education. In this paper we first explored the Mind Maps Concept, then we presented and explained the advantages of M‑K toolkit and how this can support mind mapping and integration of a whole array of learning experiences. In the last section we presented two case studies to provide the evidence of how the M‑K toolkit and Mind Maps can lead to education paradigm shift and enhance the outcome of the learning experience in higher education.

 

Keywords: mind map, higher education, mobile knowledge, m-k toolkit

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Sharing in Academic Institutions: a Study of Multimedia University Malaysia  pp313-324

Ming-YuCheng

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp297 - 397

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Abstract

Recent developments have witnessed the emergence of a new economy where knowledge has become a valuable resource and asset. The dynamism of the new economy requires us to not only quickly create knowledge, but also to acquire and apply knowledge quickly. One possible way to do so is to share our knowledge effectively. Knowledge sharing is envisaged as a natural activity of the academic institutions as the number of seminars, conferences and publications by academics is far exceeding any other profession, signifying the eagerness of academics to share knowledge. However, instead of knowledge sharing, "knowledge hoarding" could be more prevalent in academic institutions. This paper examines knowledge sharing behavior among academics in a private university in Malaysia. Factors affecting the willingness to share knowledge, broadly classified as organizational, individual and technology factors, are examined. The overall findings revealed that incentive systems and personal expectation are the two key factors in driving academics to engage in knowledge sharing activity. "Forced" participation is not an effective policy in cultivating sharing behavior among academics.

 

Keywords: knowledge sharing, knowledge management, higher education institution, sharer model

 

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Journal Article

Networking Intellectual Capital towards Competitiveness: An Insight into the European Higher Education Institutions  pp228-239

Elena-Mădălina Vătămănescu, Diana-Luiza Dumitriu, Andreia Gabriela Andrei, Cristina Leovaridis

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, Guest Edited Issue, Editor: Dr. Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Dr. David Cegarra-Leiva, pp171 - 253

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Abstract

Abstract: Today, the interplay between the network society and the knowledge society have provided an overarching perspective on how global interconnectivity and knowledge transfer cannot be separated anymore. The advancement of technological opportunitie s and the openness towards knowledge acquisition have reconfigured the landscape of human collaboration. As a premise of achieving sustainable competitive advantages, organizations should reconsider the value of the social and information exchange within their networks, facilitating organizational learning and proper response to the field dynamics. Against this backdrop, the present paper addressed the viewpoints and practices of academics from European higher education institutions in regard to leveragin g the intellectual capital within their online social networks. Stressing on subjects from European developing countries, the research advanced a new concept ‑ the network‑based intellectual capital … liable to account for an emergent capital reification and relied on an interview‑based survey with 27 professors. As the findings showed, although acknowledged as a paramount competitive advantage, the network‑based intellectual capital is yet to be properly capitalized.

 

Keywords: Keywords: network-based intellectual capital, higher education institutions, competitiveness

 

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Journal Article

The Tacit Knowledge Capacity of Lecturers: A Cross‑Country Comparison  pp131-142

Tugberk Kaya, Burak Erkut

© Sep 2018 Volume 16 Issue 2, The Management of IC and Knowledge “in action”, Editor: Dr Maria Serena Chiucchi and Dr Susanne Durst, pp73 - 154

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Abstract

The importance of universities as knowledge hubs is increasing due to knowledge production via research and teaching. An emerging aspect of knowledge management literature is the study of the knowledge requirements of universities. In particular, the transformation from knowledge creation to knowledge sharing has proved to be important in the university context and is subject to cultural differences. For example, previous research has indicated that a physician’s Tacit Knowledge Capacity (TKC) is affected by social software and social media. This creates opportunities to carry out new research on different occupations that have an intense TKC. As part of this research, a survey was conducted in order to assess the TKC of lecturers in both Germany and North Cyprus. These are two countries that have universities providing knowledge management programmes. The research determined the TKC in both countries and compared the two in order to determine if cultural factors affect the TKC of the profession. Through this research, the authors aimed to contribute to the ongoing research on the knowledge requirements of universities that will enable them to be knowledge intensive institutions. The Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences at Near East University, which has 2200 students and 20 chairs, was compared with the Faculty of Business and Economics at the Technische Universität Dresden, which has 2800 students and 23 chairs. The study was carried out to provide an intercultural comparison, which is currently lacking in the Knowledge Management field. The research findings have highlighted the factors influencing the transfer and the accumulation of tacit knowledge.

 

Keywords: Tacit Knowledge, Knowledge Accumulation, Knowledge Transfer, Tacit Knowledge Capacity, Higher Education, Universities

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital Management as Part of Knowledge Management Initiatives at Institutions of Higher Learning  pp181-190

Andrew Kok

© May 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ICICKM 2006, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp131 - 254

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Abstract

Aspects such as human capital, structural capital and customer capital are important variables of the whole intellectual capital management programme, which forms part of the knowledge management initiatives of institutes of higher learning. The skills and expertise of university staff as part of its human capital are discussed. Structural capital will encompass aspects such as the role of innovation and intellectual property rights. Customer capital of the university and the knowledge of stakeholders in the field of tertiary education are becoming more important. The results of a study done at a South African university are used to indicate which of these aspects needs to be measured and a new framework for measurement and management of IC is discussed.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, intellectual capital management, higher education

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management and Higher Education: A UK Case Study  pp11-26

Desireé Joy Cranfield, John Taylor

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

This paper presents the initial findings of a case study conducted at seven Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom. The Case Study utilizes Stankosky's Knowledge Management (KM) pillars to enterprise learning — leadership, organization, technology and learning — as a lens to investigate and understand Knowledge Management practices and perceptions within Higher Education Institutions, looking at challenges of implementation within this sector. Higher Education Institutions within the United Kingdom are very complex institutions, with diverse backgrounds, history, culture, resources and missions. The University presents itself in today's knowledge economy with a dichotomy of priorities, one which aims to provide quality teaching and research activity, and the other, to ensure effective and efficient management and administration within an increasingly competitive market. Being a service, non‑profit organization ensures that the values of scholarship remain a very important aspect of its mission; yet, the external environment within which HEIs conduct their business today is rapidly changing, forcing HEIs to reflect on how they do 'business' given the external pressures they face. This case study uses the Grounded Theory methodology to begin to unpack the issues related to the implementation of Knowledge Management within this context. It focuses on two aspects of the case study — the characteristics of universities and academics that hinder or promote the implementation of KM, and the perceptions of Knowledge Management and its challenges for implementation within the HEI sector. Initial findings are presented.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, UK case study, grounded theory, higher education

 

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Journal Article

Cross‑cultural Validation of UTAUT: The Case of University VLEs in Jordan, Russia and the UK  pp25-34

Boyka Simeonova et al

© Jan 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Special Edition for ECKM 2013, Editor: Monika Petraite, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

Abstract: Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are learning platforms within universities aiming to facilitate and enhance students’ learning. In order to increase the chances for success of VLEs implementation it is essential to identify the factors which influence the students’ decision making as far as accepting and using VLEs are concerned. In this paper we are applying one of the most popular models, the so‑called Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model developed by Venkatesh et al. (2003) to identify and test the underlying factors influencing VLE acceptance and use. UTAUT is a relatively new model sparsely applied in cross‑cultural settings and in the context of Higher Education (Straub, 2009). We are testing the model in four business schools in universities in three different countries: the UK, Russia and Jordan. The results show that although all items from the original UTAUT questionnaire have their place in the final groupings obtained through the factor analysis, the ‘clean’ agglomeration of items into groups shown by the original paper and a few others could not be replicated in the individual countries or in the overall sample despite the good sample size obtained in our study. The paper raises a question about the replicability of the original results and calls for reconsideration of the way the model is applied.

 

Keywords: UTAUT, technology acceptance, virtual learning environments, higher education

 

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