The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

Knowledge Transfer to Industry at Selected R1 Research Universities in North Carolina  pp3-16

Dennis Harlow

© May 2017 Volume 15 Issue 1, Learning and Unlearning for Sustainability, Editor: Sandra Moffett, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

Public universities in the United States are divided into different levels of type by research agendas. Large public universities (typically known as R1 research oriented universities) are directed to serve the public interest by developing transferrable knowledge (patents and intellectual property) that can leverage the public investment made in these large universities and their research agendas through state and federal funding by enhancing social and commercial goals of the funding entities. This paper is an impact assessment of formal and informal industry collaboration and knowledge transfer activities study and looked at technology transfer offices, secondary information and public reports such as patent filings to determine if the level of knowledge transfers was increasing or decreasing or staying the same at three large public universities in the USA (North Carolina, UNC Charlotte and North Carolina State) and two North Carolina R1 private schools (Duke University and North Carolina State University. My primary hypothesis for the research was that much of the research and knowledge at public universities was not finding its way to industry use either through licensing or other means and that various methods (i.e., research papers) of transferring this knowledge were ineffective in making this transfer. My research concluded that despite strong state and federal funding of this research as well as private grants researchers tended to concentrate on research that enhanced their academic publications’ reputations which is resulting in fewer academic papers. The practical economic benefits of much of this research was doubtful since the correlation to outputs such as patents was not improving but plateauing over time in some cases.

 

Keywords: Knowledge transfer offices effectiveness; intellectual property; R1 universities

 

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Journal Article

Implicit Evaluations of Intellectual Capital in Practical Decision Making  pp236-243

Albrecht Fritzsche

© Jul 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, ECIC 2012, Editor: John Dumay, pp208 - 278

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Abstract

A lot of the confusion about the measurability of intellectual capital can be explained by a neglect of the difference between an object, the capital it provides, and the profit from the application of this capital. An analysis of this difference leads to the distinction between the potential of intellectual capital for economic process and its actual realization. Case studies from different areas of managerial practice show that decision making about intellectual capital considers it both in the mode of potentiality and actuality. However, the level to which the difference of modality is made explicit varies a lot. Talent management and network planning tend to minimize reflections about potentiality. This is possible because these reflections are an imp licit part of the preceding activities in the company that provide the basis for the decision situation. In intellectual property management, decision makers have more freedom to consider the further potential of the capital in question. In the applicatio n of different methods to evaluate intellectual capital, it therefore seems important to look for a strong consistency between the way how actuality and potentiality are taken into consideration by the structure of the business practice and the approach o f the method.

 

Keywords: theory of action, business strategies, IC management in practice, human resources, supply networks, intellectual property

 

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