The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Journal Article

An Insight into Knowledge Flow in Biomedical Engineering Science  pp153-160

A.A Arntzen-Bechina, C.A.D Leguy

© May 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ICICKM 2006, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp131 - 254

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Abstract

Technology has always played an important role in medical science by contributing to health care development. The use of technological instruments helps diagnostics of normal and pathologic states; and thus leads to a better understanding of human physiology. Once a diagnosis is established, a suitable treatment or surgical intervention can be considered, according to the available clinical capacities. In the last four decades, research in biomedical engineering science has led to the manufacturing of cutting edge medical instruments. For example, the introduction of endoscopes into surgical practice is considered one of the biggest success stories in the history of medicine. However in order to develop appropriate medical instruments or procedures, one key issue for successful biomedical research is the ability to understand in an efficient way the requirements of the medical practitioners. Furthermore, the two main actors namely biomedical universities and the biomedical industry involved in the development of new technologies need to collaborate and cooperate to a greater extent. This paper discusses the role and the process of knowledge flow between the various stakeholders involved in the design of medical instruments. The aim is the delineation of a general framework facilitating the understanding of the technical and medical requirements in order to develop new tools and methods.

 

Keywords: Knowledge flow, biomedical engineering, knowledge sharing and transfer process

 

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Journal Article

Organisational Knowledge Base and Knowledge Transfer in the Shipping Industry  pp325-340

Jiangang Fei, Solomon Chen, Shu-Ling Chen

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp297 - 397

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Abstract

Severe shortages of skilled and qualified personnel in the shipping industry have been addressed in different ways. This paper looks into the issue from a new perspective where high mobility in the shipping industry is seen as a vehicle of knowledge flows that can be used for knowledge transfer. This paper argues that while organisations cannot stop personnel leaving, it is possible, however, to retain part of the knowledge that these leaving personnel carry through effective knowledge management practices. This paper introduces organizational knowledge base (OKB) and identifies knowledge flows both at organizational and industrial levels showing that much can be done to effectively utilise knowledge spillovers brought about by high personnel mobility in the shipping industry. The paper then examines the barriers and facilitators of knowledge transfer in the context of the shipping industry. Due to the unique characteristics of the shipping industry such as the absence of genuine employment link between seafarers, and the remoteness of the onboard workplace from the onshore management, conventional knowledge management practices need to be modified to suit the context of the shipping industry. The paper suggests that advanced information and communication technologies, a dedicated knowledge sharing culture, and strong leadership are essential factors in facilitating knowledge transfer in the context of shipping. The implications of the application of knowledge management practices in the shipping industry are two fold: one is the change of perspectives towards the shortage of skilled personnel in the shipping industry which in turn impacts on maritime education and training; the other is the realignment of resources in tackling the problem of skill shortages, that is, a shift from employee retention to knowledge retention. It is expected that such an attempt will shed light on the understanding of skill shortages from a different perspective and provide insight on the tasks that the shipping industry is facing.

 

Keywords: OKB, human mobility, knowledge management, knowledge flow, knowledge transfer

 

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Journal Article

Tacit Knowledge Elicitation and Measurement in Research Organisations: a Methodological Approach  pp373-386

Alexeis Garcia-Perez, Amit Mitra

© Jan 2008 Volume 5 Issue 4, Editor: Charles Despres, pp347 - 550

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Abstract

Contextual complexities as a result of the nature of knowledge based resources of organisations are increasingly the bases of competitive advantage. n the third generation of KM theories and techniques, intra‑ organisational flows of knowledge resources have become as important as the resources themselves. Management of such flows is an imperative rather than an alternative for most organisations. When attempting to implement effective KM strategies, most organisations assume complete awareness of what knowledge‑based resources they own and which elements of these, need to be shared. However, such an assumption may not always be valid. While many scholars have conducted research into measurement and management of explicit knowledge, limited progress has been made in applying similar processes to tacit knowledge resources. The KM research and practice communities agree on the importance of identifying and measuring tacit knowledge‑based resources, while absence of suitable instruments designed to apply to it continues to be a problem. This paper outlines a method to identify and measure organisational tacit knowledge‑based resources based on the concepts of tacit knowledge stocks, their intra‑organisational flows, and enablers and inhibitors of such flows. The research paper describes the method, and the process of its validation, performed within a research and development organisation.

 

Keywords: organisational tacit knowledge, knowledge discovery, tacit knowledge stocks, tacit knowledge flows, knowledge enablers, knowledge inhibitors

 

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Journal Article

Action through a Learning History  pp49-58

Matti Koivuaho, Harri Laihonen

© Dec 2005 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

This paper offers a view of communication networks in which professionals are connected via knowledge flows and communication processes. The discussion focuses on a case study of software business processes in two small‑ size Finnish software companies. The paper has two objectives. First, it assesses the knowledge flow model as a tool that can be used for developing knowledge‑intensive services. Second, it offers a new way of seeing a software project from a communication and knowledge flow perspective.

 

Keywords: Knowledge flows, communication, software development, complexity thinking

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 1 / Jan 2006  pp1‑90

Editor: Charles Despres

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Keywords: Active learning, Africa, Business intelligence, Case study, Cognitive diversity, CommonKADS], Communication, Complexity, Complexity representation , Complexity theory, Complexity thinking, Cross-functional teams, e-Commerce, Enterprise semantic web, First order reflection, Group dynamics, Human capital, Intellectual capital, Knowledge acquisition, Knowledge acquisition, Knowledge capital, Knowledge cooperation, Knowledge co-production, Knowledge creation, Knowledge flows, Knowledge learning, Knowledge sharing, Knowledge transfer, Knowledge transfer cycle, Lightweight ontologies, Organisational practices, Performance measurement, Predictive maintenance, Relational capital, Second order reflection, Semantic information retrieval, Semantic interoperability, Social networks, Social Software, Software development, Structural capital, Tourism, Value creation, Weblog, Wiki

 

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