The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Journal Article

Sharing Contextual Knowledge in Today's Workplace Environments  pp1-12

Farhad Daneshgar, Chandra S. Amaravadi

© Jan 2005 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

Due to an evolution of business models compatible with networked economy, office — environments of this age need effective support for collaboration among office workers. This article demonstrates that existing Extended Office Systems (EOS) are not specifically designed to maintain awareness and knowledge‑sharing requirements of the collaborating actors of many of today's networked office environments. Using an awareness framework for sharing of contextual knowledge in collaborative business processes, this article provides general design directives for a Collaboration‑ Aware EOS (CAEOS) system that facilitates sharing of the contextual knowledge among office workers in networked offices. In order to assess its effectiveness, this framework is applied to a network management case study with the aim of identifying the awareness requirements of the actors within that process. The results confirm effectiveness of the framework. The components of the framework, that is the process model and the awareness model, are then used as analytical tools as input to the design of CAEOS for achieving its collaborating goals. It is suggested that the process model component of the framework to constitute foundation for the knowledge‑base component of the CAEOS, whereas the awareness model of the framework to constitute foundation for the inference engine of the CAEOS'.

 

Keywords: awareness, extended office systems, EOS, collaboration support systems, knowledge sharing, knowledge representation, groupware, business intelligence

 

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Journal Article

What is the K in KM Technology  pp11-22

Kavi Mahesh, J. K. Suresh

© Apr 2005 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 44

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Abstract

This article addresses the problem of how technology adds value to an overall KM solution. It presents the core problem of KM as matching contexts using knowledge attributes and defines KM technology as that which manages knowledge attributes. The paper illustrates this by analyzing several positive and negative examples of technologies and presents two challenges for knowledge management as a field. The requirement for KM technology to manage knowledge attributes can be applied in designing effective KM solutions, selecting KM products, devising a proper KM strategy, and controlling investments in KM. The definition of KM technology also provides a focus for research to bridge gaps in technology that currently limit the widespread use of knowledge attributes.

 

Keywords: KM technology, knowledge attribute, knowledge representation, context matching

 

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Journal Article

Effects of Knowledge Representation on Knowledge Acquisition and Problem Solving  pp153-158

Mohamed Khalifa, Kathy Ning Shen

© Apr 2006 Volume 4 Issue 2, ICICKM 2005, Editor: Charles Despres, pp91 - 216

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Abstract

The way knowledge is represented influences the effectiveness with which that knowledge can be shared and reconstructed. Of particular interest to this study is the hypertext knowledge representation. Based on the schema theory, we propose a model explaining the effect of the hypertext knowledge representation on the user's problem solving performance. The sophistication of the knowledge structure that the user can construct from the hypertext knowledge representation is proposed as an intervening variable mediating the effect of hypertext on the problem solving performance. According to our model, the hypertext representation of the "collective schemata" of a group of experts allows the user to acquire a more complex and better integrated knowledge structure that is more similar to the experts' than does a linear representation. The model further hypothesizes that the complexity, integration and degree of similarity of an individual's schemata to that of domain experts in turn improves significantly the individual's problem solving performance. Compared to the linear representation, the hypertext representation of expert knowledge is expected to improve the quality of problem solving in the organization through the facilitation of the acquisition of more sophisticated knowledge structures by the users. A field experiment was used to verify the hypotheses of our model. This research demonstrates the important role of hypertext knowledge representation in supporting knowledge construction and problem solving.

 

Keywords: Hypertext, knowledge representation, knowledge elicitation, knowledge construction, problem solving

 

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Journal Article

Facilitating Organisational Sustainability Through Expert Investment Systems  pp45-54

Carol Royal, Farhad Daneshgar, Loretta O'Donnell

© Nov 2003 Volume 1 Issue 2, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 226

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Abstract

This paper uses literature from the fields of organisational sustainability and human capital, which have demonstrated a link between sustainable human capital and the financial performance of the firm, to argue that securities analysts need to be able to systematically analyse human capital in order to provide transparent and well‑informed investment recommendations. It is the function of securities analysts to attempt to predict the future financial performance of firms within an industry sector. Models for this analysis have traditionally been heavily quantitative, relying on mathematical models of future earnings forecasts, based on published annual financial statements from listed companies. Securities analysts' quantitative modeling methods are directly underpinned by qualifications and certification processes that encourage demonstrated skills in quantitative methods. The authors provide an opportunity for securities analysts to systematically gain insights on the human capital of firms using a future expert system, called Human Capital Analyser (HCA), whose general characteristics are also outlined in the conclusion of this article. This expert system will help bridge the knowledge gap in the work of securities analysts.

 

Keywords: knowledge representation human capital analysis expert systems finance industry securities analysts

 

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Journal Article

Educational Ontology and Knowledge Testing  pp123-130

Réka Vas

© Mar 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, ECKM 2006, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 130

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Abstract

The Bologna declaration aims at providing solutions for the problems and challenges of European Higher Education. One of its main goals is the introduction of a common framework of transparent and comparable degrees that ensures the recognition of knowledge and qualifications of citizens all across the European Union. This paper will discuss an ontology‑based model that supports the creation of transparent curricula content (Educational Ontology) and the promotion of reliable knowledge testing (Adaptive Knowledge Testing System). Beside the description of the evolution of the Educational Ontology, which has been developed within a research project by the Department of Information Systems, role of the ontology in managing, mapping and sharing the knowledge of curricula will be discussed in details as well. The Educational Ontology addresses establishing relation between the requirements of labour markets and the content of curricula through competencies that can be acquired during a given training program. Another critical aspect of this research concerns the measuring of knowledge. The second part of the paper will focus on the possibilities of adaptive knowledge testing and describes how a suitably elaborated ontology model can support adaptive testing of students by enabling a detailed exploration of missing knowledge and knowledge areas.

 

Keywords: knowledge representation, ontology, adaptive testing

 

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Journal Article

Issues in Structuring the Knowledge‑base of Expert Systems  pp314-323

Eric C. Okafor, Charles C. Osuagwu

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, Editor: Charles Despres, pp257 - 347

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Abstract

The major bottlenecks in expert system development lie within the processes of eliciting and representing knowledge. Knowledge representation schemes combine data structures, and interpretative procedures that enable the extraction of the knowledge embedded in the data structures. A broad spectrum of knowledge types need to be represented, but available representation techniques are not optimum systems since they vary in level of expressiveness and power. Knowledge demands more than the conventional representation structures used for databases and information. This is because information is derived from processing, refining and analysing raw data. The extra refinement, analysis and addition of heuristics to information converts it to knowledge. This paper discusses the major issues in the quest for an efficient knowledge representation technique and assesses the performance and level of usefulness of some of the most successful approaches in knowledge representation.

 

Keywords: knowledge representation, knowledgebase, production rule, semantic nets, frames, propositional logic, predicate logic, fuzzy logic

 

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Journal Article

Reconsidering Knowledgeƒ And Business Improvement  pp61-70

Larry Lucardie, Paul Hendriks, Joost van Ham

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

The ever growing complexity of market processes continues to increase the importance of knowledge as the organization's core capability to maximize business performance. Current conceptions of knowledge and knowledge representation, however, prove to be highly unproductive. A fundamental problem here is that insight into the nature of knowledge is an inevitable requirement for adequate knowledge management that, nevertheless, is hardly met in business. In this article, we claim that adopting a functional view of the nature of knowledge reveals and restores the relation between knowledge and corporate effectiveness. In a functional approach to conceptualization, functional equivalence instead of observable similarity serves as the basis for classification. The sets of conditions that have to be met in a particular situation are here taken as functional demands. These functional demands may vary across situations, thus precluding the valid possibility of a static one‑on‑ one connection between functions and individual objects. Not the objects as potential instances of classes, but the relationships between objects given their properties and situations, defined in terms of functional demands, become central. These relationships define the concepts, and thus what we know. Classification amounts to relational matching of specified situations to specified objects. The functional view not only enables content improvement through rational classifications, but also enhances process designs, implementations and process maintenance. It also aligns information technology to the new demands set by the knowledge economy by enabling goal‑oriented, transparent and easy‑to‑use‑and‑modify knowledge structures. The paper further describes a real world case taken from the financial services industry to exemplify how a functional analysis of knowledge ‑including to the functional view aligned MatchÂ’ Technology‑ realizes great improvements in business performance.

 

Keywords: knowledge representation formalisms, functional view, rational classifications, functional equivalence, Match

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 3 / Jul 2007  pp257‑347

Editor: Charles Despres

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Keywords: architectures for knowledge management systems, business school, case based reasoning, communities of practice, customer relationship management, decision making, discovery query, expert, failure factors, frames, fuzzy logic, Heidegger, info-culture, info-structure, infrastructure, knowledge acquisition, knowledge adaptation, knowledge communication, knowledge dialogues, knowledge dissemination, knowledge generation, knowledge management practices, knowledge management systems, knowledge media, knowledge representation, knowledge transfer, knowledge utilization, knowledgebase, learning organization, ontology, organizational knowledge, popper, predicate logic, production rule, propositional logic, ranking semantic relations, relation robustness, relationship search, semantic associations search, semantic nets, semantic web, social capital, structuration theory, success factors of KM, validation

 

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