The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

For info on the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), click here
Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
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Journal Article

Measurement of Business Intelligence in a Finnish Telecom‑munications Company  pp83-90

Virpi Pirttimäki, Antti Lönnqvist, Antti Karjaluoto

© Dec 2005 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

Business intelligence (BI) is a managerial concept and tool that is used to help organisations to manage busi‑ness information and to make effective decisions. Measurement of BI is generally considered an important issue but at the same time it is considered difficult to carry out in practice. There is also a lack of research on the topic. The paper describes the current knowledge regarding the measurement of BI and makes a contribution on the currently small amount of empirical knowledge on the topic. The research is implemented by means of a literature review and action research.

 

Keywords: Business intelligence, case study, measure, measurement, telecommunications

 

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Journal Article

Developing an Instrument for Knowledge Management Project Evaluation  pp61-68

Zuhair Iftikhar

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 68

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Abstract

Many knowledge management (KM) projects have been initiated, some of which have been successes but many have been failures. Measuring the success or failure of KM initiatives is not easy, and in order to do so some kind of measurement process has to be available. There are three points at which evaluation of KM projects can, and should be, done: (1) when deciding whether to start and where to focus, (2) once under way, following up on a project and making adjustments if needed, and (3) when completed, to evaluate the project outcomes. This paper concentrates on the first two areas by developing a general instrument for evaluation of KM projects.

 

Keywords: Knowledge management, Evaluation process, Measurement instrument, Success factors

 

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Journal Article

The Ambiguous Relationship of Leadership and Intellectual Capital: Understanding how Intellectual Capital is Developed  pp35-44

Author Name

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

Intellectual Management deals with these interactions between all resources, tangible and intangible to create maximum value. Leadership plays an important role when turning knowledge within an organization into Intellectual Capital. Therefore it is of major interest to consider and evaluate the relationship as well as possible synergies between Intellectual Capital and Leadership to improve organizational processes and performance.

 

Keywords: Knowledge, Intellectual Management, Leadership, Organizational Processes, Measurement

 

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Journal Article

Lighting up 'Blind Spots' while Measuring Knowledge Capital  pp31-38

Andrea Fried, Fabricio Orellana

© Dec 2005 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

Practical experiences in developing and introducing performance measurements systems for measuring and managing knowledge capital have shown that these instruments do not sufficiently fulfil the expectations of their users. Some authors even point out that the fundamental understanding of methodological and conceptual issues is inade‑quate. Therefore, we suggest that instead of creating further new instruments, an explanation of how and when Perform‑ance Measurement Systems (PMS) become effective is necessary. We argue that highlighting their potential production of "blind spots" and comprehending the use of PMS more reflexively will bring more sustainable effects. As a result, the concept of First and Second Order Reflection of PMS is introduced.

 

Keywords: Knowledge capital, performance measurement systems, organisational practices, first and second order reflection

 

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Journal Article

Introducing a Toolbox for IC Measurement in the Iran Insurance Industry  pp169-180

Adel Moslehi, Ali Mohaghar, Kambiz Badie, Caro Lucas

© Apr 2006 Volume 4 Issue 2, ICICKM 2005, Editor: Charles Despres, pp91 - 216

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Abstract

This paper reports on an empirical study, which investigates the Intellectual capital measurement and management in the Iran Insurance Industry. According to the current situation of the firms in this industry, we develop a toolbox for managers to help them to identify and evaluate ICs in this industry .in this regard we investigate intellectual capital stocks, intellectual capital processes and performance in this industry through three phases including: Identifying, Measuring, and Analyzing. Based on this toolbox, the priority of Iran Insurance industry was uncovered and the road map was discussed.

 

Keywords: Intellectual capital measurement, insurance Industry

 

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Journal Article

Alternative Accounting to Manage Intellectual Capital  pp7-18

György Boda, Peter Szlávik

© Mar 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, ECKM 2006, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 130

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Abstract

The connection of intangible assets to cash flow generation is a major management issue. In addition, a majority of the investment is made in the intangible capital items. This paper intends to present an approach that supports the continuous measurement of intangible assets and allows an extended value based management framework that considers both tangible and intangible elements. The value of a company includes significant elements that are not described by the generally accepted accounting methods such as relationship capital, organizational capital, and knowledge and competence of employees. These elements are possible to be presented in an expanded balance sheet. We face challenges when we try to quantify the elements for a concrete date or when we intend to capture the exact changes throughout a certain period. Based on generally accepted accounting standards, the investment into intellectual assets is mostly handled as cost. This cost is accountable against the revenue of the period therefore decreasing the period's profit. This approach does not allow the carrying forward of any cost element for future periods, even in the case of a long term cost. If we reconsider our cost management framework and the costs that serve the development or replacement of intellectual capital items we manage as capital expenditures in intellectual capital items and not as a period's expense, we could build up a ground‑up approach to the handling of intellectual capital items. This approach results in the compilation of two balance sheets and profit & loss accounts that are alternative versions of each other. The visualization of intellectual assets and intellectual capital might significantly change the decision making process and the general thinking of the management. The authors suggest further research in order to support the development of the conceptual framework and the operational rules of practice.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital value based management measurement alternative accounting intangible balanced sheet

 

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Journal Article

Identifying a Suitable Approach for Measuring and Managing Public Service Productivity  pp447-458

Aki Jääskeläinen

© Aug 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECIC 2009, Editor: Christiaan Stam, Daan Andriessen, pp397 - 534

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Abstract

Every public organisation faces the challenge of improving productivity. In this effort, productivity measures are essential managerial tools. However, the task of measuring service productivity has proven to be challenging. A key reason for the challenges seems to be related to the intangibility of services. The objective of this paper is to identify and apply a productivity measurement method satisfying the information requirements of public managers. The study is carried out using a qualitative case study approach. The paper consists of two parts: first, the current knowledge of the issue is examined by reviewing the literature on (service) productivity and performance measurement; second, an action research is carried out in the context of four case services of the City of Helsinki, Finland. A disaggregated approach to productivity measurement is applied. Three different measurement frameworks and methods are evaluated in light of practical criteria for measurement. Finally, a matrix method is chosen and applied in practice. As a result the paper provides more understanding of the process of applying the disaggregated productivity measurement approach in the context of public welfare services.

 

Keywords: intangibles, performance measurement, productivity management, public services

 

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Journal Article

Measuring the Impacts of an IC Development Service: the Case of the Pietari Business Campus  pp469-480

Paula Kujansivu, Antti Lönnqvist

© Aug 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECIC 2009, Editor: Christiaan Stam, Daan Andriessen, pp397 - 534

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Abstract

Intellectual capital (IC) development includes a wide set of activities focusing on the improvement of an organisation's intangible resources. However, it is often unclear what kind of impacts different IC initiatives have. The current literature lacks appropriate methods for identifying and measuring them. If it is not possible to assess the impact of various development activities it is difficult to justify IC investments or choose between alternative service providers. This paper, based on a case study, examines how to assess the impacts of an IC development initiative. The empirical research setting is the Pietari Business Campus, a knowledge‑intensive business service organisation providing various development services for its twelve member companies operating in the St. Petersburg region in Russia. In this paper, the literature is first examined to understand how the impacts of development activities can be assessed in different contexts. The characteristics of these approaches are then utilised to formulate the assessment methodology used in the case study. The empirical assessment consists of both numerical indicator data and subjective interview data. The case study showed that the activities and outputs can be measured quite accurately but that the outcomes are difficult to capture. The main challenge results from external changes taking place and making it difficult to observe the outcomes of development activities. Due to the challenging nature of the assessment task and the relatively low managerial priority of the issue (on the customers' side) it is suggested that subjective assessment methods may provide sufficient information in many cases. Although this paper is focused on IC development, there may be similar contexts in other knowledge‑intensive services in which the lessons of this study might be useful.

 

Keywords: effect, impact, intellectual capital, intellectual capital development, knowledge-intensive business service, measurement, service

 

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