The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

For info on the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), click here
Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
 

Journal Article

The Influence of Technical, Social and Structural Factors on the Effective use of Information in a Policing Environment  pp65-76

Vince Hughes, Paul Jackson

© Jan 2005 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

Throughout the world, police services are increasingly adopting a proactive, intelligence‑led approach to crime management. These services operate within environments characterized by firm hierarchy, the command and control paradigm and high social sensitivity. The implementation of strategies for the exploitation of knowledge and information within such environments reveals particular insights into organizational knowledge management. Understanding these issues may be of great value, particularly as despite the commitment to intelligence led policing, the outcomes to date have not met expectations. This paper proposes that social and political issues have the ability to influence knowledge management strategy by drawing upon Pan and Scarbrough's socio‑technical model to show the progression of the intelligence‑led policing philosophy over the past decade.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management, Business Intelligence, Public Service, Policing

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management Model for Information Technology Support Service  pp353-367

Maria Mvungiand Ian Jay

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp297 - 397

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Abstract

User support has been in existence since the inception of computers in business and with their workforce dependent on technology, organizations depend on the quality of information technology (IT) support services to quickly restore and prevent any downtime due to any failure in technology or its use. Standardization of systems, and the speed with which knowledge becomes redundant, means that support‑personnel technical knowledge is gained and discarded on a continuing basis. This research evaluates how an organization can conceptualize knowledge management (KM) of IT Support in order to maximize user productivity. Grounded Theory approach is used to explore the knowledge management activities and processes present within the Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) group of a multidisciplinary research centre called iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science (LABS). Firstly, the approach involved participant observation to gather information about the work flow of EIT support forming the first attempt at open coding. Secondly, semi‑structured interviews, as well as the use of the Repertory Grid Technique were used to gather multiple perspectives of support personnel. Extant literature was then incorporated to develop the emergent theory. This research found that the knowledge management foundation for IT Support is strategy and culture based on the constructs of commitment and reciprocity. Further, communication and competency were identified as additional enabling conditions. From this, an adapted KM model for IT Support Service is presented. The model agrees with Nonaka and Konno's 'ba' concept within the Socialization‑Externalization‑Combination‑Internalization (SECI) process. Every transition between the quadrants representing ba (knowledge platforms) requires 'conversion energy', in agreement with IT Service Management Service Management Functions of Microsoft's Operations Framework.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, information technology, support service, repertory grid, grounded theory

 

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Journal Article

Measuring the Impacts of an IC Development Service: the Case of the Pietari Business Campus  pp469-480

Paula Kujansivu, Antti Lönnqvist

© Aug 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECIC 2009, Editor: Christiaan Stam, Daan Andriessen, pp397 - 534

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Abstract

Intellectual capital (IC) development includes a wide set of activities focusing on the improvement of an organisation's intangible resources. However, it is often unclear what kind of impacts different IC initiatives have. The current literature lacks appropriate methods for identifying and measuring them. If it is not possible to assess the impact of various development activities it is difficult to justify IC investments or choose between alternative service providers. This paper, based on a case study, examines how to assess the impacts of an IC development initiative. The empirical research setting is the Pietari Business Campus, a knowledge‑intensive business service organisation providing various development services for its twelve member companies operating in the St. Petersburg region in Russia. In this paper, the literature is first examined to understand how the impacts of development activities can be assessed in different contexts. The characteristics of these approaches are then utilised to formulate the assessment methodology used in the case study. The empirical assessment consists of both numerical indicator data and subjective interview data. The case study showed that the activities and outputs can be measured quite accurately but that the outcomes are difficult to capture. The main challenge results from external changes taking place and making it difficult to observe the outcomes of development activities. Due to the challenging nature of the assessment task and the relatively low managerial priority of the issue (on the customers' side) it is suggested that subjective assessment methods may provide sufficient information in many cases. Although this paper is focused on IC development, there may be similar contexts in other knowledge‑intensive services in which the lessons of this study might be useful.

 

Keywords: effect, impact, intellectual capital, intellectual capital development, knowledge-intensive business service, measurement, service

 

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Journal Article

A Problem Solving Typology of Service Business  pp37-45

Paavo Ritala, Tatiana Andreeva, Miia Kosonen, Kirsimarja Blomqvist

© Mar 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

In this study, we sketch a problem‑based perspective of the service business, following the latest theoretical developments in the field of the knowledge‑based view of the firm and the related problem‑solving perspective. In particular, we approach services as problems to be solved for and with the customer. Our paper outlines a framework in which the knowledge processes regarding service delivery are conceptualized on two axes: 1) the intensity of knowledge sharing and co‑creation of services between the provider and the customer and 2) the nature of the problem‑solving process regarding the service delivery. Based on the developed conceptual framework, we provide implications concerning the organizing of various types of services in terms of the different problem‑solving processes they require. Furthermore, after identifying the distinctive problem‑solving processes with the help of the typology, theoretical and practical implications for service and knowledge management are discussed.

 

Keywords: services, service business, knowledge, co creation, problem solving, typology

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management and Sharing in Local Government: A Social Identity Theory Perspective  pp131-142

Nico Schutte, Nicolene Barkhuizen

© Aug 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, Editor: Ken Grant, pp101 - 171

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Abstract

Abstract: Service sectors, like local governments, offer various services to assist and develop communities and, as such, society at large. Therefore the interaction between people, knowledge, and technology play a vital role in attaining high service qua lity, economic development, and growth. Knowledge management (KM) techniques and tools can be applied in local government systems to improve service delivery and create service excellence. In addition a social identity theory perspective could give an i ndication of how local government officials categorise themselves in their social environment and as a salient group influence KM management and ‑sharing. The main objective of this paper was to investigate the extent to which social identity theory influ ences knowledge management and sharing in a South African local government institution. Semi‑structured interviews and focus groups were used to obtain data from 22 government officials. The findings highlight some of the issues interlinking KM with self‑ categorisation, group identity, and local government service delivery improvement, giving a framework for adopting KM in local government.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Knowledge management, social identity theory, knowledge sharing, learning organisation, public service, organisational effectiveness

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital in Manufacturing and Service Firms of the Dominican Republic: An Exploratory Approach  pp198-208

Victor Gómez-Valenzuela

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, ECIC special conference issue, Editor: Dr. Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Dr. David Cegarra-Leiva, pp171 - 253

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper analyses 64 variables related to the intellectual capital of manufacturing and service firms in the Dominican Republic. In addition, the study included 10 control variables related to firms characteristics, and 10 variables related to firms performance, for a total of 84 variables. The main findings show that business performance in manufacturing firms relies mainly on relational capital and depends to a lesser extent on human capital, and that innovative performance depends on a closer relation between human and structural capital. In the case of service firms, both business and innovative performance rely on structural and relational capital, indicating the role of suppliers as a potential source of innovations.

 

Keywords: Keywords: intellectual capital, Dominican Republic, manufacturing and service firms

 

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Journal Article

The Mediating Effects of Trustworthiness on Social‑Cognitive Factors and Knowledge Sharing in a Large Professional Service Firm  pp240-253

Max Evans, Anthony Wensley, Ilja Frissen

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, ECIC special conference issue, Editor: Dr. Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Dr. David Cegarra-Leiva, pp171 - 253

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper extends the findings of a large empirical study of organizational information and knowledge sharing that examined the interplay of several notable social and cognitive factors, including trust, shared language, shared vision, tie stre ngth, homophily, and relationship length. Initial data analysis examined the direct, relative, and collective effects of these social and cognitive factors on organizational knowledge sharing factors (Evans, 2012). The results of this analysis demonstra ted that co‑worker trust influences, in a statistically significant way, each factor used to operationalize organizational knowledge sharing, namely: willingness to share knowledge, willingness to use knowledge, and perceived receipt of useful information /knowledge (Evans, 2013). This study presents the results of a secondary data analysis, which examines whether perceived trustworthiness in co‑workers acts as a mediating variable between the previously mentioned social‑cognitive variables and knowledge sharing factors. Data were collected from 275 knowledge workers (legal professionals and paralegals) engaged in shared legal project work, at one of Canadas largest multijurisdictional law firms. The nature of their work requires a significant relianc e on co‑workers, across offices nationwide, for both explicit and tacit information and knowledge. The nature of projects allows respondents to objectively evaluate the outcomes, gaining a better sense of the perceived effects of knowledge shared. A metho d put forward by Baron and Kenny (1986), which includes hierarchical multiple regression analysis, was used to test for the mediating effects of perceived co‑worker trustworthiness. The results of the study showed that the relationship between shared l anguage and shared vision on information and knowledge sharing is mediated through perceived trustworthiness. Moreover, this mediation is subject to the nature of the relationship between co‑workers. For shared language, the role of co‑worker relationship is still more nuanced as perceived trustworthiness was found to have a mediating effect between shared language and knowledge sharing in relationships between co‑workers with whom they worked well together on projects only. There is no apparent mediation of trust for shared language in negative co‑worker relationships, which demonstrates one of the few interesting effects found to be dependent on the nature of the co‑worker relationship.

 

Keywords: Keywords: mediating effects of trust, knowledge sharing in a large professional service firm

 

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Journal Article

Using an Intellectual Capital Statement to Deploy Knowledge Management: The Example of an Austrian Chamber of Agriculture  pp45-59

Roland Bardy, Arthur Rubens, Gerhard Pelzmann

© Mar 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECKM 2015, Editor: Andrea Garlatti and Maurizio Massaro, pp1 - 88

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Abstract

Abstract: The paper reports on the impact of building an intellectual capital statement for the Chamber of Agriculture in Styria, Austria (Landeskammer Steiermark, LK StyriaŽ), and with the subsequent issues of organizational development. LK Styria i s a knowledge‑based organization where intellectual capital accounts for a large share of the entitys value. Building on the activities of LK Styria and their outcomes, a knowledge‑based intellectual capital inventory was set up for the human, structural and relationship resources based on the method Wissensbilanz made in GermanyŽ. The strengths of the intellectual capital of Styria LK lie primarily in its core competencies of promotion, training and consulting. The contexts of LK Styria that produce va lue are its working conditions and the relationships with their members, customers, the public at large, and with public functionaries. It was found that the establishment of an of the Intellectual Capital (IC) Statement not only enhances the performanc e of LK Styria but also increases the resilience of the LK Styria when unexpected changes arise on the EU‑level and on the national level, and thus expands the sustainability of the organization. Consequential to this IC Statement, measures were introduce d to improve processes and outputs: a central lever was to be a new framework for process orientation; enhanced quality management was to be introduced as well as newly structured information handling inside and outside the organization.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Intellectual capital, knowledge management, public institutions, agriculture, service and consulting

 

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