The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

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Journal Article

The Impact of Stories  pp53-64

Joanna Sinclair

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

Stories intrigue the field of Knowledge Management. Employing stories in both personnel and stakeholders communication is currently being recommended in several best practice guides on effective knowledge transfer and leadership communication. The aims of this article are to present further understanding of the impact of stories, and assess which kind of communication tasks stories are most apt for by considering stories as a medium. This allows for the examination of stories through two interlinked theories: Social Presence Theory and Media Richness Theory. These are found to be limited indicators of media effectiveness and it is suggested that elements of the theories should be broadened to make both theories useful for assessing core media effectiveness, although it is recommended that they be combined with other modes of evaluation to achieve thorough assessment of media impact.

 

Keywords: Stories, Storytelling, Communication, Social Presence Theory, Media Richness Theory, Knowledge Management

 

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Journal Article

Journalists, the Makers and Breakers of Relational Capital  pp97-104

Joanna Sinclair

© May 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, ECKM 2006, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 130

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Abstract

The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to call attention to why storytelling is a pivotal building block of Relational Capital and second, to provide an understanding of how stories receive media coverage, in essence explain how PR professionals seek to influence the business press into telling stories about their client companies and how journalists in turn react to the story material sent to them by PR departments. This paper approaches this issue through gatekeeping theory and presents an example of the various gatekeepers affecting the media coverage of corporate stories. Although the paper includes theoretical reflection, it chiefly attempts to bring new insights to the topic by providing empirical research results. The paper reports findings from a qualitative analysis of semi‑structured, in‑depth interviews conducted with six journalists from the Finnish business press and six Finnish PR Professionals. The article shows three types of stories that PR professionals use to lure the business press into writing news about their client companies. These are: 1) an idea of a story 2) a hidden story and 3) a ready‑made story. The article concludes in showing that an idea of a story will be appealing to business journalists, especially if the story is not obviously helping a commercial enterprise improve their image. It shows that a hidden story, however, can be appealing to business journalists even if the story would clearly improve a commercial enterprise's image. The ready‑made story, though, is found to be appealing to journalists chiefly as background information that might trigger a later story.

 

Keywords: storytelling, gatekeeper theory, media coverage, relational capital

 

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Journal Article

The Story of Knowledge: Writing Stories that Guide Organisations into the Future  pp161-172

John P Girard, Sandra Lambert

© May 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ICICKM 2006, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp131 - 254

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Abstract

Many organisational gurus highlight the value of oral narrative or storytelling as a catalyst for organisational change or a way to share knowledge. Tomes of articles describe seasoned raconteurs single handedly inciting enormous transformation in organisations. Oxymoronically many written works are describing the power of oral narrative. Surely these printed exposés are themselves motivators for change; so why the continued emphasis on the face‑to‑face storytelling? There is no disputing the fact that oral narrative is a powerful form of communicating; however, it is not always feasible. In fact, there are times when the written word packs a more powerful punch. Often it is simply not possible to catch the ear of a wide audience simultaneously, or even at all. Many people simply will not take time from their busy schedules to listen to stories. Busy executives seem to prefer the written word to the spoken. In these cases, the power of the pen offers a persuasive substitute. This is a tale about such stories in action, each of which seemed to sow the seed of change. Of course, time will be the real test; however, anecdotal evidence seems to support the proposition that well‑written futuristic stories provide an excellent alternative to face‑to‑face oral narrative. At least in these examples, the written story proved to be a motivator for organisational change and an effective way to share knowledge. This paper is about the use of narrative to share knowledge; it is part tutorial and part theory. Building on the foundational knowledge developed by Denning, Snowden, Prusak, and others this paper describes the "how to" of effective storytelling to create and share knowledge within organisations.

 

Keywords: storytelling, organisational change, knowledge management

 

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Journal Article

The LIFE Technique – Creating a Personal Work Profile  pp57-72

Peter Sharp

© Mar 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

This paper focuses on the question: how can a personal work profile be created most easily and effectively for people considering their future? A personal work profile is a detailed description of the skills a person would like to use and characteristics of a work environment they would like to experience. This is valuable for all people of working age because it helps them find, or move towards, work which suits them best. This is tremendously important in Knowledge Management (KM). This is because when the an individual’s knowledge and skills are matched well with the work they conduct, there is a high level of job satisfaction, motivation and performance. Therefore, if there is a good match, employees and organisations benefit enormously. The paper categorises and critically examines literature relevant to the research question and explains why the new Look Into your FuturE (LIFE) technique (‘the LIFE Technique’) was designed, what is new about it, how it works and how it has been road tested, reflected upon and improved. The primary data strongly suggests that the stages of the Technique are useful and easy to do, and that it is a valuable initiative that should be developed and applied further in the future.

 

Keywords: storytelling, personal knowledge and skills, work profile

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue / Mar 2011  pp1‑84

Editor: Eduardo Tome

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Editorial

Guest Editor Dr. Eduardo Tomé
Eduardo concluded a PhD in Economics with a thesis on the European Social Fund in 2001 at the Technical University in Lisbon. His main research interests are Social Policy and Human Resources / Knowledge Management / Intellectual Capital. He has published papers in International Refereed Journals as the Journal of Intellectual Capital, the Journal of European Industrial Training, the International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, and the International Journal of Learning and Intellectual Capital. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management. Since 2001 he has presented papers in around 4 international conferences every year.

 

Keywords: nalytic hierarchy process, change processes, co-creation, collective intelligence, competitive intelligence, conceptual learning, hospital-in-the-home units, intellectual capital, KIBS, knowledge interactions, trust-building mechanisms, computer services, case study, KM 2.0, knowledge, knowledge creation, knowledge management, knowledge management maturity, knowledge sharing, knowledge-based development, learning dynamics, operational learning, personal knowledge and skills, problem solving, sensitivity modelling, service business, services, social computing, SPF framework, storytelling, typology, university, user-generated content, Web 2.0, work profile,

 

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