The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

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Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
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Journal Article

Assessing the Impact of Competence Utilisation in Innovation Strategy: A Correlational Analysis  pp45-56

Andrew L. S. Goh

© Jan 2005 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 90

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Abstract

This study is concerned about the role of competence utilisation in innovation strategy. Using a correlational analysis based on non‑parametric statistics, it validates the impact of competence utilisation in relation to venture performance by testing three hypotheses. Data was gathered via a survey instrument to extract The findings are as follows: (1) The level of utilisation in technology, product and market competencies, as manifested by its role in innovation strategy, is positively correlated to venture performance; (2) The impact of competence utilisation is the strongest on sales profitability, followed by company growth and then organisational effectiveness; and (3) In terms of relative impact on venture performance, technology competence is the most effective, followed by product and market competence.

 

Keywords: Innovation Strategy Competence Utilisation and Venture Performance

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management Strategic Alignment in the Gulf Cooperation Council Countries  pp1-10

Jaflah AlAmmary, Chun Che Fung

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

Organizations today should actively incorporate knowledge strategy (KS) into their Business Strategy (BS) as knowledge has been recognized as a strategic element in the performance of the organization. Hence, the current research hypothesis that the alignment between BS and KS has a positive effect on the organizational performance. In an attempt to explore the alignment between KS and BS, an operational model is proposed based on the prior studies in the strategic alignment. BS types were viewed in terms of Miles and Snow's (1978) typology of Defenders, Analyzers and Prospectors. Two KS strategies include: Aggressive Knowledge Strategy (AKS) and Conservative Knowledge Strategy (CKS) were selected to examine the KM strategic alignment with business strategies. This model was empirically validated through a survey of 106 banks selected from the six Gulf countries (Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, UAE, and Oman). With respect to the perspective of alignment, the moderation approach was chosen. The overall finding of the research demonstrated that there is a strong association between KS and BS and that the alignment between KS and BS clearly influenced the organizational performance.

 

Keywords: knowledge strategy, strategic alignment, business strategy, banking sectors

 

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Journal Article

Value, Kaizen and Knowledge Management: Developing a Knowledge Management Strategy for Southampton Solent University  pp135-144

S J Rees, H Protheroe

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, ECKM 2008, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 198

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Abstract

The process of development of the strategic plan for Southampton Solent University offered a vehicle for the development of kaizen and knowledge management (KM) activities within the institution. The essential overlap between the methods offers clear benefits in the HE environment. In consideration of the aspects of KM and kaizen, various potential opportunities were identified as targets for improvement, and clarified by knowledge audit as to value and viability. The derived outcomes are listed along with some of the principal factors and perceived barriers in the practical implementation of the outcomes. Knowledge audit applied here focused on the identification of where value arises within the business. Resource constraints and the practicalities of a people‑centred system limit the permissible rate of innovation, so precise focus on the areas of business activity of most significance to the mission and client base is crucial. The fundamental question of whether such a strategy should be developed as a separate strand or embedded into existing strategies is discussed. In practice, Solent has chosen to embed, principally for reasons of maintenance of ownership and commitment. Confidence in the process has been built through prior success with trialled activities around retention, where an activity‑ based pedagogic framework was adopted to address issues with an access course. Other areas of early intervention include the development and reengineering of recruitment and admissions processes, and the development of activities and pedagogy based on the virtual learning environment as exemplars of the importance of cyclical feedback in continuous improvement. The inherent complexity of processes running across the university as an organisation offers opportunities for benefits from the through‑process approach implicit in kaizen. The business value of the institution is in the skills of its employees and its deployed intellectual property, and thus the importance of the enhancement of both tangible assets and intangible processes is critical to future success.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, kaizen, knowledge audit, knowledge strategy, knowledge management in higher education, strategy development

 

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Journal Article

Designing a Strategy Formulation Process for New, Technology‑Based Firms: a Knowledge‑based Approach  pp245-254

Antonios Livieratos

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

In the knowledge‑based economy the nature of what is strategic has been modified along with the importance of knowledge and its management. One of the most important implications of these changes is the expansion of resources and products that are globally tradable, highlighting the importance of knowledge as the key economic resource of lasting competitive advantage. As a consequence of this shift in the economy, an increasing number of industries are moving from the closed innovation model to the open innovation model that created porous boundaries between the innovative company and its surrounding environment, changing the interand intra‑organizational modes of coordination. In an environment where knowledge is the key economic resource and the open innovation model is applied in more and more industries, we are experiencing the increasing importance of the New Technology‑Based Firm (NTBF). NTBFs face a number of difficulties mainly associated with a lack of resources and entrepreneurial skills and in order overcome the difficulties NTBFs strive towards flexibility while accelerating the development and commercialization processes by creating andor entering business networks. By adopting a knowledge‑based view for NTBFs and consequently placing knowledge in the centre of a systemic innovation model, knowledge networks constitute an asset for NTBFs. As this new form of cooperation takes multiple and often unpredictable forms it is thus essential to develop strategy formulation tools and processes that can help NTBFs to face their challenges. Until now little attention has been given to the development of strategy tools and processes tailored for the requirements of NTBFs. The present paper presents a concept to cope with NTBFs' by developing a generic process for strategy formulation. In this respect, an action research project was initiated. The proposed concept was initially designed, although not exclusively, for a Greek NTBF, Astrofos Ltd. The author, who is coordinator of the incubator where Astrofos is sited, is acting as a strategy consultant for the firm and has taken part in all its major decisions since summer 2007. In order to build the strategy formulation process, this paper proposes a mapping technique that attempts to depict a NTBF's tangible and intangible transactions as well as the strength of ties between the focal NTBF and its partners and the complexity of the knowledge. In developing the mapping technique, we have used a combination of the concept of weak ties, derived from social network analysis, with the notion of complex knowledge, as this combination was initially proposed by Hansen (1999). Additionally, a set of questions is proposed that have to be answered in order to pass from knowledge identification to knowledge transfer, from a strategic point of view. In this regard, the presented methodology constitutes an effort, on the one hand, to study the emergent patterns in what is considered to be a chaotic or disordered system and, on the other, to stimulate the creation of new patterns in the system that would be consistent with the NTBF's strategy.

 

Keywords: new technology-based firm, NTBF, innovation, strategy formulation process, value network, mapping technique, social network analysis, knowledge complexity

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital of the European Union 2008: Measuring the Lisbon Strategy for Growth and Jobs  pp489-500

Christiaan Stam, Daan Andriessen

© Aug 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECIC 2009, Editor: Christiaan Stam, Daan Andriessen, pp397 - 534

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Abstract

In 2004 we published the report Intellectual capital of the European Union (Andriessen & Stam, 2004). In this report we provided insight in the value of the intellectual capital of the 15 countries of the European Union, in relationship to the goals set by the European Council in March 2000. The main Lisbon goal was to become "the most competitive and knowledge‑based economy in the world" in 2010. Since our previous report, the EU grew from 15 to 27 countries and the Lisbon goals were reformulated in 2005. The aim of this paper is to measure the IC of the competitive and dynamic knowledge‑based economy, the EU decided to focus on "delivering stronger, lasting growth and creating more and better jobs" (CEC, 2005d, p.7). In this paper we translate this overall goal in 38 indicators. As the data was not available for all the new member states, we decided to limit our paper to the so‑ called EU‑19. Based on our measurements we conclude that the EU‑19 is still behind Japan and far behind the USA, however the EU is catching up as both Japan and the USA have considerably lower growth figures than the EU‑19. From an IC perspective, the EU is geographically divided. The Nordic countries are still the best performing countries. The southern European countries and the new member states stay behind. However, as the new member states invest more in their IC, it might be expected that their positions will improve in the future. Of all the new member states the Czech Republic has the best potential. The aim of our paper was to measure the progress of the Lisbon Agenda for growth and jobs. Based on our measurements we conclude that the EU‑19 is successful in terms of creating more and better jobs, but not successful in terms of delivering stronger, lasting growth. In order to further close the competitiveness gap, the EU should primarily focus on strengthening its SC and RC.

 

Keywords: Intellectual capital, intellectual capital of nations, European Union, Lisbon strategy for growth and jobs, Lisbon goals, IC monitor, measurement, multidimensional value measurement

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge‑Based Strategies for Knowledge Intensive Business Services: a Multiple Case‑study of Computer Service Companies  pp151-160

Enrico Scarso, Ettore Bolisani

© Jan 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Ettore Bolisani, Enrico Scarso, pp1 - 180

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Abstract

While knowledge is increasingly considered to be a key resource for companies, the models for formulating business strategies that explicitly include it as a core component are still lacking. The paper investigates such issues by considering the particular case of computer service companies, which can be seen as Knowledge Intensive Business Services (KIBS) firms connecting the sources of innovation (i.e. large multinationals, research laboratories, universities, etc.) to the individual needs of the local customers. In doing so they operate as mediators between the local cognitive requirements and the more generic knowledge available in the global environment. Since those companies base their competitiveness on the capability to manage knowledge flows among various actors, the formulation of their business strategies requires new approaches that directly focus on knowledge assets and relevant processes. The paper describes the results of a survey involving twenty‑one computer service companies located in the Northeast of Italy. The study allows the user to draw useful schemes for the identification of knowledge‑based strategies, which can be of use beyond the specific context of investigation. In particular, rather than proposing completely new models for knowledge‑based strategic formulations, the paper analyses the way knowledge can be integrated into more traditional strategic frameworks. The assumption is that these approaches can be more comfortable and understandable by the management of companies whose business is strongly based on knowledge but don't have deliberate knowledge management strategies.

 

Keywords: knowledge-based strategy business strategy KIBS computer services case study

 

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Journal Article

The Formulaic and Embryonic Dimensions of Knowledge Management Strategy: A Social Practice Perspective  pp132-138

Yassaman Imani

© Apr 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ICICKM 2010 special issue, Editor: W.B. Lee, pp85 - 180

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Abstract

Knowledge Management (KM) literature is populated with a variety of perspectives, prescriptions and studies of practice, which can be complex, contradictory and confusing to practitioners who seek to make sense of, and adapt them for practice. A sub‑set of this literature argues that a clear link to business strategy is critical to KM strategy’s success (see Storey & Barnett, 2000; Zack, 1999, 2002), but extant research shows that this link is often weak (Leidner, 1998; Ruggles, 1998; Storey & Barnett, 2000; Zack, 1999). These debates however, adopt a mainly rational perspective which overlooks the ‘emergent’ and ‘sensemaking’ aspects of strategizing. This paper argues that an extended ‘social practice’ (Hendry, 2000), which brings together rational, emergent and sensemaking aspects of strategizing process, provides a useful multi‑perspective framework for investigating the extent to which practitioners’ approach to setting up KM strategies in their firms are influenced by their firms’ business strategies. Using an extended social practice framework, I examined the managerial accounts of the processes of setting up KM strategies in 18 global firms. This study contributes to a better of understanding of the ways in which business strategy influences the KM strategizing process. The findings support extant research by suggesting that a weak link between KM and business strategy existed in these firms. However, this study demonstrates that from the social practice perspective, firms take two different approaches to their KM strategy, formulaic (to support their routine activities) and embryonic (to address their immediate strategic agenda), which signify their enduring and transient KM practices. Finally, this study concludes that further research is needed to explore the dynamic interactions between the formulaic and embryonic KM approaches.

 

Keywords: KM strategy, embryonic KM strategy, formulaic KM strategy, link between KM and business strategy, KM strategy as social practice

 

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Journal Article

Strategically Developing Intellectual Capital Effectiveness: A Conceptual Model for Innovative Companies  pp309-324

Harold Harlow

© Nov 2013 Volume 11 Issue 4, ECIC 2013, Editor: Lidia Garcia Zambrano, pp280 - 386

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Abstract

Abstract: Developing intellectual capital at companies often results in large numbers of patents filed with little results other than protection of firm historical patents against intellectual property intrusion by current competitors or future competitor s. This paper presents exploratory research to classify into those patents filed in past years by several major technology companies as well as measuring the business results of the patents which shows the need for the new strategic conceptual model pres ented in this paper. A new approach to align corporate resources toward patent strategies, management capability and process with strategic intent is presented which enables firms to assure that all needed considerations are present in a comprehensive te chnology and patent strategy of intellectual capital development, especially at technology firms.

 

Keywords: Keywords: technology development model strategy, intellectual capital strategies, innovation and patent myths

 

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