The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

For info on the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), click here
Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
To join the EJKM review committee click here
 

Journal Article

A Theory‑Based Approach to the Relationship between Social Capital and Communities of Practice  pp257-264

El-Sayed Abou-Zeid

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, Editor: Charles Despres, pp257 - 347

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

There is almost a consensus that tacit component of organisational knowledge is of critical strategic importance because, unlike explicit knowledge, it is both inimitable and appropriable. Because of its characteristics, organisational tacit knowledge is usually created and shared through highly interactive conversation and shared experience, i.e., through a socialisation process. At the firm's level, the effectiveness of the socialisation process depends on the firm's social capital. At group level, it has been argued that communities of practice form the basis of a firm's ability to create and share tacit knowledge. Therefore, investigating the relationship between social capital, communities of practice and individual human action is crucial in understanding the dynamic of cross level knowledge creation and utilisation and in understanding organisational learning process. In order to study this relationship Giddens' theory of structuration is used as it provides an integrating meta‑theory that recognises social reality as constituted by both subjective human actors and by objective institutional properties and attempts to articulate a process‑oriented approach that relates the realm of human action and institutional realm. Based on Giddens' theory a model of the interaction between human action and social capital of the firm is developed. According to this model such interaction is mediated through a firm's communities of practice, which are conceptualised as the means for realising the different types of modality between social capital and human action. Such conceptualisation of a firm's communities of practice as the means for realising the different types of modality between social capital and human action provides a fine‑grained approach to study the impact of their elements, i.e., shared repertoire, mutual engagement and joint enterprise, on the structural, relational and cognitive dimensions of a firm's social capital respectively. In addition, it explicates the duality of firm's communities of practice, namely: they are both the medium and the outcome of collective human action. This model also shows the need for further research in two areas. First is the study of the constraining roles of a firm's communities of practice in creating and sharing organisational tacit knowledge. Second is the study of social capital influencing organisational members in their relation to communities of practice.

 

Keywords: Knowledge management, social capital, communities of practice, structuration theory

 

Share |

Journal Article

Does Intellectual Capital Management 'Make a Difference'? A Critical Case Study Application of Structuration Theory  pp515-526

John A. Tull, John C. Dumay

© Jan 2008 Volume 5 Issue 4, Editor: Charles Despres, pp347 - 550

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The central problem addressed in this paper is how intellectual capital (IC) management can progress beyond measurement and disclosure to provide a more dynamic interpretive scheme, in order to meet strategic management's demand that IC should 'make a difference'. Via a longitudinal case study, we observe an evolving use of narrative in disclosing IC and the manner and impacts of that change, set in the real example of a sophisticated organisation's struggle to realise the potential value of managing IC amidst rapid business change and intense competition. In order to frame the discussion, elements of Giddens' 'structuration theory' are critically applied to understand the recursiveness of the change that occurred from within the organisation. We report three main findings. First, organisation's operating environment, as reflected in changes to the framework adopted for managing IC despite continuing frustration in realising the envisaged benefits. Second, we establish the use of structuration theory as a tool to analyse the manner and impact of IC practices in future research. Third, we show how the stated aims of IC practice have not yet been fully realised by the studied organisation, thus providing a realistic example of the possible failings of IC practice due to inadequacies of the modalities employed by management to bring about recursive change and the need for a fuller assessment of projective agency.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital, structuration, narrative, organisational change, strategic impact

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 3 / Jul 2007  pp257‑347

Editor: Charles Despres

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: architectures for knowledge management systems, business school, case based reasoning, communities of practice, customer relationship management, decision making, discovery query, expert, failure factors, frames, fuzzy logic, Heidegger, info-culture, info-structure, infrastructure, knowledge acquisition, knowledge adaptation, knowledge communication, knowledge dialogues, knowledge dissemination, knowledge generation, knowledge management practices, knowledge management systems, knowledge media, knowledge representation, knowledge transfer, knowledge utilization, knowledgebase, learning organization, ontology, organizational knowledge, popper, predicate logic, production rule, propositional logic, ranking semantic relations, relation robustness, relationship search, semantic associations search, semantic nets, semantic web, social capital, structuration theory, success factors of KM, validation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 4 / Dec 2007  pp347‑550

Editor: Charles Despres

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: architectures for knowledge management systems, business school, case based reasoning, communities of practice, customer relationship management, decision making, discovery query, expert, failure factors, frames, fuzzy logic, Heidegger, info-culture, info-structure, infrastructure, knowledge acquisition, knowledge adaptation, knowledge communication, knowledge dialogues, knowledge dissemination, knowledge generation, knowledge management practices, knowledge management systems, knowledge media, knowledge representation, knowledge transfer, knowledge utilization, knowledgebase, learning organization, ontology, organizational knowledge, popper, predicate logic, production rule, propositional logic, ranking semantic relations, relation robustness, relationship search, semantic associations search, semantic nets, semantic web, social capital, structuration theory, success factors of KM, validation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 1 / Jul 2008  pp1‑74

Editor: Charles Despres

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: architectures for knowledge management systems, business school, case based reasoning, communities of practice, customer relationship management, decision making, discovery query, expert, failure factors, frames, fuzzy logic, Heidegger, info-culture, info-structure, infrastructure, knowledge acquisition, knowledge adaptation, knowledge communication, knowledge dialogues, knowledge dissemination, knowledge generation, knowledge management practices, knowledge management systems, knowledge media, knowledge representation, knowledge transfer, knowledge utilization, knowledgebase, learning organization, ontology, organizational knowledge, popper, predicate logic, production rule, propositional logic, ranking semantic relations, relation robustness, relationship search, semantic associations search, semantic nets, semantic web, social capital, structuration theory, success factors of KM, validation

 

Share |