The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

IC and Knowledge Formation by Hidden Structures … Long Term Costs of new Technology and Participative Design  pp221-235

Klaus Bruno Schebesch

© Sep 2011 Volume 9 Issue 3, ECIC 2011, Editor: Geoff Turner and Clemente Minonne, pp181 - 295

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Abstract

Many innovative businesses formed around energy or bio‑related activities, for instance, are often the result of collective action of organisations involved in many‑sided markets, which can be found in and around focusing environments such as business incubators or tech¬no¬logy centres. Within such environments, group interests beyond those of single producers and their immediate clients exist and interfere. Rather generically, important economic outcomes of innovations are se¬quen¬ces of cost reduc¬¬tion events, the pace of which is influenced by technology and networking alike. Moreover, new products or technologies are producing long term costs difficult to anticipate, which eventually, in response to private and public awareness and knowledge formation, will have to be inter¬nalized. More traditional industries like textiles rely in general on conservative business models and use new technology in rather restricted ways. Product design is fashion orien¬ted and there¬fore predominantly “artistic” in nature, distribution channels are directed towards out¬lets facilitating physical contact of clients with the produce. New technology enters main¬ly via more mechanized production cycles for a given set of narrowly defined final products. The formation of Intellectual Capital (IC) in such industries is a slow. The presence of low creativity products indicates underutilization of both new product concepts and tech¬nological possi¬bilities. Participative design procedures for new product concepts using appropriate eCommerce features point here towards a way out. Such features include well adapted recommender systems based on trust creation and opinion formation. We propose to model the effects of these long term costs of new technology and the possibly complementary effects of participative design procedures by economic agents acting within specific adaptable neighbourhoods and by formation of some trust related assets. Thereafter, the influ¬ence exerted between firms is increasing in firm similarity, in the degree of product complementarity, and it also depends on (mutual) trust relations. A sustainable innovation is more expensive than a regular one but it may lead to long term benefits and to durable competitive advantage, espe¬cially if many firms from the network collude. The associated opinion formation process which leads to sustainable innovation may be viewed as a collec¬tive cognitive process resem¬bling that of branding and re‑branding. A similar trust‑based opinion formation is also regarded as part of a pro¬ce¬dure for assessing the acceptance of many new or parallel product concepts as they derive from Participative design procedures anticipating future product uses. Stylized dynamic models, which entail an opinion formation process, can in turn be identified with different levels of sustainability commitment by innovating and imitating firms within a dynamic multi‑firm setting. Such models tend to display the statistical behaviour of some aggregates known to occur in empirical innovative processes.

 

Keywords: IC and learning, long term environmental costs, opinion and trust formation, participative design and innovation networks, sustainability, recommender systems

 

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Journal Article

A Knowledge Management Framework for Sustainable Rural Development: The case of Gilgit‑Baltistan, Pakistan  pp104-117

Liaqut Ali, Anders Avdic

© Aug 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, Editor: Ken Grant, pp101 - 171

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Abstract

Abstract: Some 50% of the people in the world live in rural areas, often under harsh conditions and in poverty. The need for knowledge of how to improve living conditions is well documented. In response to this need, new knowledge of how to improve living conditions in rural areas and elsewhere is continuously being developed by researchers and practitioners around the world. People in rural areas, in particular, would certainly benefit from being able to share relevant knowledge with each other, as well as with stakeholders (e.g. researchers) and other organizations (e.g. NGOs). Central to knowledge management is the idea of knowledge sharing. This study is based on the assumption that knowledge management can support sustainable development in rural and remote regions. It aims to present a framework for knowledge management in sustainable rural development, and an inventory of existing frameworks for that. The study is interpretive, with interviews as the primary source for the inventory of stakehol ders, knowledge categories and Information and Communications Technology (ICT) infrastructure. For the inventory of frameworks, a literature study was carried out. The result is a categorization of the stakeholders who act as producers and beneficiaries of explicit and indigenous development knowledge. Stakeholders are local government, local population, academia, NGOs, civil society and donor agencies. Furthermore, the study presents a categorization of the development knowledge produced by the stakeho lders together with specifications for the existing ICT infrastructure. Rural development categories found are research, funding, agriculture, ICT, gender, institutional development, local infrastructure development, and marketing & enterprise. Finally, a compiled framework is presented, and it is based on ten existing frameworks for rural development that were found in the literature study, and the empirical findings of the Gilgit‑Baltistan case. Our proposed framework is divided in four levels where lev el one consists of the identified stakeholders, le

 

Keywords: Keywords: sustainability, rural development, remote regions, framework, stakeholder, indigenous knowledge, requirement analysis, knowledge society

 

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Journal Article

Editorial ‑ Learning and Unlearning for Sustainability  pp1-2

Sandra Moffett

© May 2017 Volume 15 Issue 1, Learning and Unlearning for Sustainability, Editor: Sandra Moffett, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

As an academic, my core function is learning. Not only engaging in personal lifelong learning but by being a central part in the learning of my family, friends, students, colleagues, business partners, and co‑authors. Sustaining learning is essential in a world where 'more of the same' dilutes its impact. We are constantly dealing with change, as individuals, as part of organizations and as consumers and contributors to society. The challenge we face in learning is quicker application, faster recovery from failure and unlearning, so we do not repeat previous errors. For organizations to survive and thrive, we must create new or modified knowledge practices, strengthen customer relationships and satisfy customers, provide ‘fit for purpose’ products and services, and deliver value. Whilst ‘getting the right information to the right people at the right time’ (Davenport & Prusak, 1998) is still at the heart of Knowledge Management, theory and practice needs to push the boundaries of what is known to reveal the unknown. The only limitations is those that we place on ourselves. The aim of this issue is to challenge our current understanding of learning and unlearning to encourage knowledge management. While a common thread is evident in the papers, KM as a tool for learning, the papers provide a rich and diverse view on applying KM and its impact. The first paper in this issue by Harlow considers learning (unlearning) and the impact of such on the productivity and impact of researchers in third level institutions. Commencing with the view that much of the research and knowledge at public universities was not finding its way to industry use either through licensing or other means and that various methods (i.e., research papers) of transferring this knowledge were ineffective in making this transfer. Despite strong funding provision, researchers tended to concentrate on research that enhanced their academic publications’ reputations; this is resulting in fewer academic papers. Slettli and Singhal demonstrate how tacit indigenous knowledge can be identified and amplified through a problem‑solving approach known as Positive Deviance (Singhal et al., 2014). Contributing to the understanding of the knowledge externalization process (Nonaka, 1994) the Positive Deviance (PD) approach is premised on the belief that in every community there are certain individuals or groups whose uncommon behaviours and strategies enable them to find better solutions to problems than their peers, while having access to the same resources. In‑line with the argument for best‑fit approaches within human resources the paper by Hermanrud focuses on how the KM practice of communities of practice can contribute to an innovation strategy in a multinational company. This article is founded on practice based theorising (Feldman and Orlikowski, 2011; Wenger, 1998), which is used to theorise on what people do when they try to develop a community among themselves. The paper considers the implication of outsourcing and offshoring in terms of its contribution to learning among colleagues and community development. The main concerns discussed in this article are the spatial, cultural and cognitive reach across colleagues working from and to different locations on the globe from the perspective of community of practice. McEvoy considers how KM contributes to learning (unlearning) and working practices within the public sector. By conducting an inclusive, systematic literature review of the current state of KM research in the public sector, a total of 3000 articles published in peer reviewed journals over selected time periods have been analysed for content pertaining to public sector knowledge management. From this analysis a total of 150 papers have been selected for their direct relevance to public sector knowledge management. Initial findings of this research indicate that KM in the public sector is relatively under‑researched compared with its private sector counterpart. Despite the existing research that has been undertaken, more efforts are required towards the development of applied frameworks to support public KM initiatives. The final paper by Moffett and Reid considers KM within the private sector. A case study, focusing on customer relationship management (CRM) is presented outlining how the company considers the strategic significance of each customer and focuses on knowledge about, for and from customers. The results from this research inform current thinking and add to knowledge in the strategic areas of KM and CRM. I hope you find reading this issue thought‑provoking. From the encouragement of KM in young learners to established researchers, from theory to practice, these papers encourage further research and application in the field of Knowledge Management. I would like to express my gratitude to the EJKM editorial team for their support in bringing these papers to a wider audience. As we strive to generate rich, contemporary KM research I would encourage you all to consider EJKM as a useful outlet for your work, together we can build sustainability in learning. References Davenport, T. and Prusak, L. (1998), Working Knowledge ‑ How Organisations Manage What They Know, Harvard Business School Press, Boston Feldman, M. S., and Orlikowski, W. J., (2011) Theorising practice and practicing theory. Organization Science, 22(5), 1240–1253. Nonaka, I. (1994), A Dynamic Theory of Organizational Knowledge Creation, Organization Science, 5, 14‑37 Singhal, A., Buscell, P. and Lindberg, C. (2014), Inspiring change and saving lives: the positive deviance way, Plexus Press Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

 

Keywords: learning, unlearning, knowledge, sustainability

 

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