The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

Design of Sustainable Development: Intellectual Value of Large BRIC Companies and Factors of their Growth  pp535-558

Elvina Bayburina, Tatiana Golovko

© Jan 2010 Volume 7 Issue 5, Editor: Kimiz Dalkir, pp535 - 662

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Abstract

Intellectual capital and its components can be regarded as the source for a company's organic growth to maintain sustainable development. Under the crisis conditions most of financial reserves are unavailable; the inner organizational efficiency by means of intellectual capital is a question of survival edge for most of the large companies of emerging markets. Multidirectional trends of the development of BRIC economies played a significant role in this discussion and the issue became more complicated under the pressure of the crisis. Notwithstanding BRIC countries can be regarded as leaders of so‑called developing economies. In terms of the downturn, however, the problem of the crisis should not be overstated: due to the cyclical changes of the world economy the stagnation will be rearranged by upturn sooner or later, however the accumulation of intellectual capital is the over time process. Intellectual capital of the company and its components can be regarded as "latent reserves" of the long term value growth. Intellectual capital is the "intangible safety‑cushion" and it can be used only by those companies who have created it years before and therefore have focused on sustainable development. The research of intellectual capital components and its role in value creation and building competitive advantage can remain an actual topic for empirical investigations, carried out in various countries and by different research centers. The intellectual value of a company is a part of the total value, created through the process of the intellectual components' accumulation. The main goal of this research is to evaluate by means of the panel data analysis the influence of particular components of intellectual capital on the intellectual value of BRIC companies. The process of intellectual capital accumulation is over time and it can be measured according to the long run panel data analysis not less than 5 years. The panel data analysis revealed that the human capital can be considered the key factor of the long‑term growth of BRIC companies of all industries. Employees and their competencies are this basis which is undervalued currently whereas most of financial assets lost trust and its value. However, specified directions of internal reserves audit and discussion of the Intellectual value on the emerging markets are very close to the fact that large BRIC companies depend a lot on the specific features of the infrastructure of each developing country. India and Russia are countries with the industrial potential, which is not fully realized, e.g. a lot of Russian companies are underinvested with unbalanced development strategies. Decrepit and out‑of‑date production facilities, in turn capital expenditures are a matter of great importance. The capital expenditures together with innovative managers and management techniques tend to be the leverage, which can push these companies towards intensive development, especially Russian companies.

 

Keywords: intellectual capital, human capital, stakeholders, growth drivers, sustainable competitive advantage, value, intellectual value, financial crisis, BRIC, developing countries, emerging markets

 

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Journal Article

Key Performance Indicators Metrics Effect on the Advancement and Sustainability of Knowledge Management  pp149-154

Mohamed Rabhi

© Apr 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ICICKM 2010 special issue, Editor: W.B. Lee, pp85 - 180

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Abstract

This paper addresses the relationship between the value of data and KPs as they relate to the sustainability of knowledge management (KM). Numerical data are compelling metrics to persuade executives and management in the organization of the significance of Knowledge Management. External statistics are usually less impactful than internal data. Nonetheless, and in the absence of internal data at the early phases of KM projects, many companies collect published data for comparable industries. In the present case, we compiled information from previous experiences of companies in the same line of business; therefore, management by‑in was secured, and the KM project was, to some extent, successfully implemented. However, there was a need to generate in‑house numbers to support promises and claims of KM benefits, and persuade all KM players from the technician to the organisation president; the ultimate objective is to have a sustainable Knowledge Management project across the organization, with visible, concrete, and quantifiable results. Equipped with the assertion “data is power”, Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and other metrics were devised and integrated into our KM processes; these measurements are being pulled out systematically, and published to the whole audience. KPIs measured included the effect of KM on (i) customer satisfaction, (ii) business impact (i.e. savings), (iii) number of projects completed on time, (iv) and the number of technical reports generated per unit of research area. Over the past few years, the data we generated shows a considerable increase in customer satisfaction with our research and technical services; significant savings were obtained each year; project timely completion indicator rose to high levels as compared to previous yearly data; the electronic technical and scientific library experienced a build up of valuable know‑how reports. Knowledge re‑use as shown by reliance on internal resources was the standard and routine practice. On the other hand, many other qualitative observations, like effect on health, safety, and the environment are being quantified for inclusion in the KPI reporting. Based on the accumulated data, we believe that numerical values coupled with other tangible solid results will ensure a viable and sustainable KM in our organization. This hypothesis is supported by five year data and trend analysis. It confirms that internally generated statistics is a powerful tool to sway and re‑assure the organization that KM can indeed increase efficiency, enhance customer satisfaction, and drive savings.

 

Keywords: KM, sustainable, metrics, data, KPI, statistics, know how

 

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Journal Article

Intellectual Capital, trust, cultural traits and reputation in the Romanian education system  pp223-235

Marta-Christina Suciu, Luciana Picioruş, Cosmin Ionuţ Imbrişcă

© Jul 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, ECIC 2012, Editor: John Dumay, pp208 - 278

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Abstract

The contemporary approach to the concept of intellectual capital has transformed. The three components (human, relational and organizational capital) are not enough to reflect reality, as the static perspective was replaced by an integrative vision: i ntangible resources, actions and process that contribute to sustainable competitive advantage. However, this theoretical division provides solid ground for explaining the close bond between trust, cultural identity and cooperation, soft concepts, and in tellectual capital in knowledge‑based organizations. Therefore, we consider it is of high interest to identify the nature of the relational and organizational capital, and trust association. Is it first trust and then the two intellectual capital componen ts, or the other way around? Also, we can take one step further and consider the intellectual capital formation process and architectural scheme behind it. This paper aims firstly at offering a theoretical framework for the liaisons between the concepts p reviously mentioned and intellectual capital, underlying specific characteristics for the Romanian educational system, especially for tertiary /higher education. The second objective is to provide new research directions, comparing the findings with situa tions of other cultures, like Japan and USA. The research methodology comprises a thorough literature review of scientific studies and of the 2011 National Romanian Education Law. It focuses on the changes and challenges for the intellectual capital forma tion phase. Also, it involves an empirical investigation of an evaluation of the current intellectual capital formation route. The research instrument is a questionnaire, collecting information for both quantitative and qualitative research purposes. The findings of this paper seek to identify the structure and dynamics of the intellectual capital formation process in the Romanian higher education system. As well, we hope to lead to concrete solutions for improving general dynamics, and acknowledgment of trust, cooperation and cultural aspects as corner stones in education intellectual capital formation area.

 

Keywords: Intellectual Capital, trust, cooperation, education, organizational culture, human capital, sustainable competitive advantage.

 

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Journal Article

Building Intellectual Capital for Sustainable Development: Combining Local Wisdom and Advanced Knowledge  pp159-169

Roland Bardy, Arthur Rubens, Paul Eberle

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Linking Theory and Practice in Intellectual Capital, Editor: Dr. Ilídio Tomás Lopes and Dr. Rogério Marques Serrasqueiro, pp145 - 212

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Abstract

When intellectual capital is built “from the scratch” in an effort to move a society’s situation to a sustainable status, there is often a need for a catalyst that triggers the endeavor. The “trigger”, in the case that is reported in this paper, was the installation of a new college in a rural community in Northern Ghana where heretofore, no comprehensive tertiary education had been available. The college established an outreach program which was destined to provide the community with increased opportunities for improving the overall social and economic well‑being. This creates an outer circle of engagement through accessing government officials, local businesses, community councils, health workers, traditional leaders (tribal chiefs), religious leaders and heads of NGOs on topics like labor relations, conflict resolution, sustainability management, social responsibility, cultural diversity, and social inclusiveness. At the onset, the members of the community contributed their traditional views on these topics and how this would combine with knowledge brought in through the new college. Since rural communities in Africa have a very intimate and intense relation to nature, good hands‑on skills and an abundance of indigenous wisdom, it was felt that this combination would result in a rich body of knowledge and competencies. Ultimately, a valuable base would be developed from this knowledge for an inventory of intellectual capital that can be transferred to generations of descendants. At the heart of this endeavor was the Center for Cross Cultural Ethics and Sustainable Development, an institution created by the college, to move these efforts forward. There are two perspectives which make this case relevant for new developments in knowledge management: One is the issue of what has been called the “fourth mission” of educational institutions (Trencher et al. 2013), moving the institutions to co‑creating sustainability by collaborating with government, industry and civil society to advance sustainable transformation in their environment. The other is that when two bodies of knowledge co‑exist, the question arises how this co‑existence should be approached. This case embeds a variety of systems‑thinking constructs. Which would be the best way to combine indigenous wisdom with new knowledge brought in by the college’s academicians and outside practitioners? How can a balance be coalesced between community needs that must often be satisfied short‑term and needs for which long‑term solutions are required? How can self‑organization and relationality be conjoined? How can intellectual capital from both the traditional and the newly acquired skills and knowledge be generated in the community? The paper reflects on both the knowledge management and the systems‑thinking interpretations of the case. community) and processes self‑reference and other‑reference.

 

Keywords: Ghana, Sustainable Development, Fourth Mission, Social Well-Being, Indigenous Wisdom, Systemic Co-Creation, Community Intellectual Capital, Luhmannian Framework.

 

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Journal Article

Effective Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning in the Context of Sustainable Development  pp56-69

Joy C.-Y. Muller

© Mar 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: John Dumay, pp1 - 72

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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore how Knowledge Management (KM) and learning can be instrumental for governments’ policy making and implementation, and to analyse how KM with the consideration of local culture and a bottom‑up approach can increase its effectiveness. The paper is composed of three main sections: first, a literature review to discuss knowledge and learning and ways it can be managed within an organisation; second, a case study on the KM strategy to achieve the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 relating to child and maternal health in Pakistan with highlights on the role played by the Lady Health Workers in KM; third, key findings, such as institutional arrangements for and social dimensions of KM, the importance of knowledge creation with a bottom‑up approach, and people’s ability to transform tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge for it to be managed and to facilitate policy implementation is provided in the conclusion.

 

Keywords: knowledge management & organisational learning, MDGs and SDGs, Pakistan, lady health workers, a bottom-up approach, sustainable development

 

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Journal Article

The Status quo of Knowledge Management and Sustainability Knowledge  pp136-148

Beate Klingenberg, Helen N. Rothberg

© Apr 2020 Volume 18 Issue 2, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp91 - 171

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Abstract

The United Nations (UN) 2030 agenda for sustainable development issues an urgent call to transition to sustainable business models and life styles. Outlining seventeen concrete sustainable development goals (SDGs), organizations and individuals are encouraged to actively participate (United Nations, 2015). However, as of the 2019 report on the SDGs, progress is slow. Organizations that aspire to be economically viable as well as socially and environmentally responsible global citizens, need to understand what sustainability means and how to institutionalize its principles. This paper posits that some of the underlying reasons for slow progress are lack of full understanding of the required knowledge and its systemic nature, as well as potentially insufficient knowledge management processes. It proposes that sustainability knowledge learning should include three “DCA” steps: 1) What to know: identify which knowledge is needed (DEFINE); 2) How to learn : develop strategies to identify sources and learning strategies for the requisite sustainability knowledge (COLLECT); 3) How to use sustainability knowledge: develop knowledge management practices that enable absorption and institutionalization (ACT). Comparing the DCA model to other sustainability knowledge management models reveals that internal processes are emphasized (ACT). Fewer models consider the second step, COLLECT. The necessity to identify knowledge needs, DEFINE is almost entirely absent. Given the complex nature of sustainability knowledge, it appears that currently, knowledge management practices may be inadequately designed to support organizations in their transformational change towards sustainability and in the development of required stakeholder partnerships. Said systemic nature is also ill reflected in knowledge management research for sustainability. Further limiting is a lack of a clear definition of sustainability knowledge. This paper is a call for research to establish a clear view of what sustainability knowledge is, and based on that, a more detailed development of effective knowledge management strategies.

 

Keywords: sustainable development goals (SDG), sustainability knowledge, sustainable development knowledge, knowledge management process, systems thinking, learning process

 

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Journal Article

A Knowledge Management System for Exchanging and Creating Knowledge in Organic Farming  pp164-183

Vincent Soulignac, Jean-Louis Ermine, Jean-Luc Paris, Olivier Devise, Jean-Pierre Chanet

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 2, ICICKM 2011, Editor: Vincent Ribière, pp110 - 207

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Abstract

: Agriculture must evolve into a more environmentally‑friendly approach while remaining economically workable. This type of agriculture is said to be sustainable. It has a systemic logic and therefore requires a strong knowledge base. In this study we propose a knowledge management IT‑based system. In the first part of our article, we discuss the potential actors of the system and their possible implications. The second part deals with the knowledge selection and formalization. The third part describes the main computing features of the knowledge server we propose.

 

Keywords: sustainable agriculture, organic farming, knowledge management system for agriculture knowledge modeling

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 5 / Dec 2009  pp535‑662

Editor: Kimiz Dalkir

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Editorial

The 9th ICICKM conference, held at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, was well attended by participants representing over 20 different countries. The international flavor of the conference continues to ensure a diverse range of papers as well as opportunities for valuable networking. As with all ICICKM gatherings, researchers, practitioners and students of KM were brought together to discuss the KM crossroads we find ourselves at in the year 2009.

Some of the key issues that emerged from the two days included a consensus that KM has evolved so we no longer need to convince people it is needed. We now need now to know how to “do KM” – that is, how to implement knowledge management in organizations in a more informed manner. In particular, the need for more how‑to guides, detailed rules, good validated practices and an overall quasi‑standard approach to KM implementation were noted as priority needs for the KM community. In addition, particular guidance is required concerning the KM teams (who should do what?) and how best to address tacit knowledge. Other issues concerned the specific components that should be present in a KM workspace and how this workspace can address the needs of different users who need to accomplish different sorts of tasks

While participants felt that we still have to convince some senior managers, we now also need to better address how to align KM processes so as to not create overhead. For example, what is the impact of KM on other parts of the organization such as training and IT units? How can we change peoples’ behaviours and how they think about the work they do? What are the new skills/competencies needed? How can they acquire them? How to integrate KM into business processes? How to integrate KM roles within existing jobs?

The good news is that the discipline and practice of KM has evolved – the bad news is that we still have a long way to go. The focus is now on how to do KM well. Educators need to focus on student competencies, skills and roles and responsibilities. Researchers need to focus on more evidence‑based and theory‑based KM. Practitioners need to focus on feedback from users and best practices.

The collection of papers in this special conference edition address the multitude of issues we currently face, and will continue to face, in the future. There is an excellent mix of practical case studies, practical tools such as intellectual capital measurement models in addition to more conceptual and theoretical approaches to solving crucial KM problems.

 

Keywords: academic education, avatars, ba, BRIC, competitive intelligence, complexity of choice, creative destruction, decision-making, developing countries, discipline, emerging markets, experiment, financial crisis, group interaction, growth drivers, human capital, Indian economy, Information Technology sector, intangible assets, Intellectual capital, intellectual value, KM in interconnected power systems, Knowledge Active Forgetting (KAF), knowledge capital, knowledge management implementation, management support systems, measurement, methods of assessment, paradigm, SET KM model, stakeholders, strategy, sustainable competitive advantage, technology, theoretical framework, UK car manufacturing industry, undergraduate degree program in Turkey, unlearning, virtual environments

 

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