The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

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Journal Article

Determinants of Successful Knowledge Management Programs  pp101-110

Mohamed Khalifa, Vanessa Liu

© Nov 2003 Volume 1 Issue 2, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 226

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Abstract

The main objective of this paper is to investigate and identify the main determinants of successful knowledge management (KM) programs. We draw upon the institutional theory and the theory of technology assimilation to develop an integrative model of KM success that clarifies the role of information technology (IT) in relation to other important KM infrastructural capabilities and to KM process capabilities. We argue that the role of IT cannot be studied in isolation and that the effect of IT on KM success is fully mediated by KM process capabilities. The research model is tested with a survey study involving 191 KM practitioners. The empirical results provided strong support for the model. In addition to its theoretical contributions, this study also presents important practical implications through the identification of specific infrastructural capabilities leading to KM success.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management Success, Infrastructural Capabilities, Process Capabilities, Institutional Theory, Technology Assimilation

 

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Journal Article

Culture as an Issue in Knowledge Sharing: A Means of Competitive Advantage  pp1-8

Martin Soley, Kaushik V. Pandya

© Nov 2003 Volume 1 Issue 2, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 226

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Abstract

In order for companies to remain competitive they must be able to utilise their knowledge of customers, products, services and resources. This can be instilled in the culture of the organisation, and this becomes paramount when the organisation deals in international markets. This research paper focuses on five main attributes, most pertinent to this study, of culture (identified by Terpstra and Sarathy, and by Gesteland). These attributes are technology and material culture, religion, language, education, and business ethics. The primary data comprised of interviews from six different e‑Businesses.

 

Keywords: culture, knowledge sharing, technology, e-business

 

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Journal Article

What is the K in KM Technology  pp11-22

Kavi Mahesh, J. K. Suresh

© Apr 2005 Volume 2 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 44

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Abstract

This article addresses the problem of how technology adds value to an overall KM solution. It presents the core problem of KM as matching contexts using knowledge attributes and defines KM technology as that which manages knowledge attributes. The paper illustrates this by analyzing several positive and negative examples of technologies and presents two challenges for knowledge management as a field. The requirement for KM technology to manage knowledge attributes can be applied in designing effective KM solutions, selecting KM products, devising a proper KM strategy, and controlling investments in KM. The definition of KM technology also provides a focus for research to bridge gaps in technology that currently limit the widespread use of knowledge attributes.

 

Keywords: KM technology, knowledge attribute, knowledge representation, context matching

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Sharing Practices: Analysis of a Global Scandinavian Consulting Company  pp109-116

Aurelie Arntzen Bechina, Thommy Bommen

© May 2007 Volume 4 Issue 2, ICICKM 2005, Editor: Charles Despres, pp91 - 216

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Abstract

In a knowledge economy landscape, successful global consulting firms are the ones putting focus on effectively and efficiently organising and managing the highly distributed diversified knowledge in the organisation. In order to sustain their competitive advantage, knowledge‑companies need to harness knowledge and to analyse knowledge sharing mechanisms and learning in the whole organisation. Knowledge sharing in global firms is a not only a cross‑department process but it should also take place within the same department. It is well recognised that the knowledge sharing mechanism is a highly complex process to put in place and to promote in the organisation. The primary goal of our research is to empirically investigate knowledge sharing and learning mechanisms within a global consulting company. The phenomenology discipline has guided our research methodology because it is the most appropriate approach for coping with the social complexity of management and business. Our research approach intends to make social sense from the knowledge sharing practices and observations conducted in order to understand how and what is shared.

 

Keywords: Knowledge sharing, learning organisation, phenomenology, information communication technology, culture, empirical knowledge sharing investigation

 

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Journal Article

Sharing Knowledge in the Organisation: a Retrospective Analysis and an Empirical Study  pp229-242

Haris Papoutsakis

© May 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ICICKM 2006, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp131 - 254

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Abstract

Knowledge has long ago been recognised as an important asset for sustaining competitive advantage. Recently, the use of information technologies for knowledge‑sharing within an organisation is identified as an important tool for managing organisational knowledge in order to improve business performance. This paper starts with a retrospective analysis of the basic theories that during the course of the 20 century, gave birth to the Knowledge‑based Theory of the Firm. Then it focuses on Knowledge Sharing within the organisation, and the Knowledge Sharing Networks that facilitate this complicated task. Through an empirical study, it evaluates the role and the level of contribution of Information Technology functions and infrastructure among knowledge‑sharing groups, for their relationship and the organisation's performance. Finally, building upon both the theoretical analysis and the empirical results, the paper concludes with guidelines that help management to overcome existing barriers and at the same time, make Knowledge Sharing Networks the backbone of their knowledge‑sharing infrastructure.

 

Keywords: organisational knowledge, knowledge sharing networks, information technology, organisational performance

 

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Journal Article

Success Factors in Implementing Knowledge Based Systems  pp211-218

Aurilla Aurelie Arntzen Bechina, Martin Nkosi Ndlela

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

The various dimensions of the problems of productivity and technology cannot be found in technology alone, but rather there are also human factors that either facilitate or constrain the ability of firms and workers to adopt and implement new technologies. This paper discusses the factors that contribute to Knowledge Management Systems effectiveness. Through a case study and literature reviews a general framework has been delineated. This framework describes dimensions involved in the adoption of technology at both the users and organisational level.

 

Keywords: information communication, technologies, technology adoption, information, social software, social aspects, knowledge management systems

 

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Journal Article

Designing a Strategy Formulation Process for New, Technology‑Based Firms: a Knowledge‑based Approach  pp245-254

Antonios Livieratos

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ICICKM 2008, Editor: Kevin O'Sullivan, pp199 - 296

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Abstract

In the knowledge‑based economy the nature of what is strategic has been modified along with the importance of knowledge and its management. One of the most important implications of these changes is the expansion of resources and products that are globally tradable, highlighting the importance of knowledge as the key economic resource of lasting competitive advantage. As a consequence of this shift in the economy, an increasing number of industries are moving from the closed innovation model to the open innovation model that created porous boundaries between the innovative company and its surrounding environment, changing the interand intra‑organizational modes of coordination. In an environment where knowledge is the key economic resource and the open innovation model is applied in more and more industries, we are experiencing the increasing importance of the New Technology‑Based Firm (NTBF). NTBFs face a number of difficulties mainly associated with a lack of resources and entrepreneurial skills and in order overcome the difficulties NTBFs strive towards flexibility while accelerating the development and commercialization processes by creating andor entering business networks. By adopting a knowledge‑based view for NTBFs and consequently placing knowledge in the centre of a systemic innovation model, knowledge networks constitute an asset for NTBFs. As this new form of cooperation takes multiple and often unpredictable forms it is thus essential to develop strategy formulation tools and processes that can help NTBFs to face their challenges. Until now little attention has been given to the development of strategy tools and processes tailored for the requirements of NTBFs. The present paper presents a concept to cope with NTBFs' by developing a generic process for strategy formulation. In this respect, an action research project was initiated. The proposed concept was initially designed, although not exclusively, for a Greek NTBF, Astrofos Ltd. The author, who is coordinator of the incubator where Astrofos is sited, is acting as a strategy consultant for the firm and has taken part in all its major decisions since summer 2007. In order to build the strategy formulation process, this paper proposes a mapping technique that attempts to depict a NTBF's tangible and intangible transactions as well as the strength of ties between the focal NTBF and its partners and the complexity of the knowledge. In developing the mapping technique, we have used a combination of the concept of weak ties, derived from social network analysis, with the notion of complex knowledge, as this combination was initially proposed by Hansen (1999). Additionally, a set of questions is proposed that have to be answered in order to pass from knowledge identification to knowledge transfer, from a strategic point of view. In this regard, the presented methodology constitutes an effort, on the one hand, to study the emergent patterns in what is considered to be a chaotic or disordered system and, on the other, to stimulate the creation of new patterns in the system that would be consistent with the NTBF's strategy.

 

Keywords: new technology-based firm, NTBF, innovation, strategy formulation process, value network, mapping technique, social network analysis, knowledge complexity

 

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Journal Article

Knowledge Management Model for Information Technology Support Service  pp353-367

Maria Mvungiand Ian Jay

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp297 - 397

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Abstract

User support has been in existence since the inception of computers in business and with their workforce dependent on technology, organizations depend on the quality of information technology (IT) support services to quickly restore and prevent any downtime due to any failure in technology or its use. Standardization of systems, and the speed with which knowledge becomes redundant, means that support‑personnel technical knowledge is gained and discarded on a continuing basis. This research evaluates how an organization can conceptualize knowledge management (KM) of IT Support in order to maximize user productivity. Grounded Theory approach is used to explore the knowledge management activities and processes present within the Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) group of a multidisciplinary research centre called iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science (LABS). Firstly, the approach involved participant observation to gather information about the work flow of EIT support forming the first attempt at open coding. Secondly, semi‑structured interviews, as well as the use of the Repertory Grid Technique were used to gather multiple perspectives of support personnel. Extant literature was then incorporated to develop the emergent theory. This research found that the knowledge management foundation for IT Support is strategy and culture based on the constructs of commitment and reciprocity. Further, communication and competency were identified as additional enabling conditions. From this, an adapted KM model for IT Support Service is presented. The model agrees with Nonaka and Konno's 'ba' concept within the Socialization‑Externalization‑Combination‑Internalization (SECI) process. Every transition between the quadrants representing ba (knowledge platforms) requires 'conversion energy', in agreement with IT Service Management Service Management Functions of Microsoft's Operations Framework.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, information technology, support service, repertory grid, grounded theory

 

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