The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
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Journal Article

One Size Does Not Fit All — Towards a Typology of Knowledge‑Centric Organisations  pp27-36

Marié Cruywagen, Juani Swart, Wim Gevers

© Oct 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, ICICKM 2007, Editor: Rembrandt Klopper, pp1 - 116

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Abstract

Organisations are increasingly turning their attention to the creation and use of knowledge as a strategic resource. Too often however, knowledge management initiatives fail to deliver the competitive advantage expected from a strategic resource. The knowledge management literature is characterised by frameworks for knowledge management implementation which tend to prescribe best‑practice methods to a large range of companies. Although useful, a key weakness of these frameworks is their inability to account for contextual differences. Consequently many organisations attempt to apply a knowledge management framework that simply doesn't fit the organisational context resulting in little or no benefit from their efforts. A shift in focus from best practice to best fit is necessary to account for the difference in organisational contexts. Systems thinking emphasises context as an important element in understanding a system, and five concepts from systems theory are used to define the criteria for establishing a best‑fit approach. A social constructionist approach to the research further affords the opportunity to identify areas of significant variation in knowledge management context and practices within knowledge‑centric organisations. A multi‑method research strategy, comprising cluster analysis and case study research, is proposed to develop insight into the emergence of different configurations of knowledge management capabilities within different organisational contexts. The proposed conceptual framework forms the foundation for building a typology of knowledge‑centric organisations which will enable organisations to choose the most appropriate approach to knowledge management based on their specific context which varies along the dimensions of their knowledge‑orientation, knowledge management intent and knowledge management enactment.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, knowledge-centric organisations, typology, social constructionism, configurational approach, systems thinking

 

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Journal Article

A Problem Solving Typology of Service Business  pp37-45

Paavo Ritala, Tatiana Andreeva, Miia Kosonen, Kirsimarja Blomqvist

© Mar 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

In this study, we sketch a problem‑based perspective of the service business, following the latest theoretical developments in the field of the knowledge‑based view of the firm and the related problem‑solving perspective. In particular, we approach services as problems to be solved for and with the customer. Our paper outlines a framework in which the knowledge processes regarding service delivery are conceptualized on two axes: 1) the intensity of knowledge sharing and co‑creation of services between the provider and the customer and 2) the nature of the problem‑solving process regarding the service delivery. Based on the developed conceptual framework, we provide implications concerning the organizing of various types of services in terms of the different problem‑solving processes they require. Furthermore, after identifying the distinctive problem‑solving processes with the help of the typology, theoretical and practical implications for service and knowledge management are discussed.

 

Keywords: services, service business, knowledge, co creation, problem solving, typology

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue / Mar 2011  pp1‑84

Editor: Eduardo Tome

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Editorial

Guest Editor Dr. Eduardo Tomé
Eduardo concluded a PhD in Economics with a thesis on the European Social Fund in 2001 at the Technical University in Lisbon. His main research interests are Social Policy and Human Resources / Knowledge Management / Intellectual Capital. He has published papers in International Refereed Journals as the Journal of Intellectual Capital, the Journal of European Industrial Training, the International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, and the International Journal of Learning and Intellectual Capital. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management. Since 2001 he has presented papers in around 4 international conferences every year.

 

Keywords: nalytic hierarchy process, change processes, co-creation, collective intelligence, competitive intelligence, conceptual learning, hospital-in-the-home units, intellectual capital, KIBS, knowledge interactions, trust-building mechanisms, computer services, case study, KM 2.0, knowledge, knowledge creation, knowledge management, knowledge management maturity, knowledge sharing, knowledge-based development, learning dynamics, operational learning, personal knowledge and skills, problem solving, sensitivity modelling, service business, services, social computing, SPF framework, storytelling, typology, university, user-generated content, Web 2.0, work profile,

 

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