The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management aims to publish perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of knowledge management
Become a Reviewer for EJKM click here
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) is available here.

For info on the International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), click here
Information about the European Conference on Intellectual Capital (ECIC) is available here
 

Journal Article

KM as a Chemin Faisant: The Valtech Experience  pp13-22

Daniele Chauvel, Charles Despres

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 68

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Valtech is a Paris‑based consulting firm established in 1993 and devoted to e‑business technologies. The company was initially structured as a distributor of new information technologies to the French and European market, which secondarily provided training in the use of its products. Valtech now positions itself as a pure knowledge‑transfer firm that instructs clients in the strategic use and development of cutting‑edge electronic technologies. Valtech organized itself according to KM principles in 1993, but only became aware of KM as a formal organizing framework in 1998. While the adoption of KM is often "pushed" onto companies by the academic or consulting communities, Valtech pulled itself toward KM organizing logics by the New Age of business it defined for itself. It is in this way an excellent example of strategic commitment and organizational design from a KM perspective. It is also relatively unique in that most of the literature records KM adoption from a "push" rather than a "pull" perspective.

 

Keywords: Knowledge Management, knowledge creation, organizational learning, knowledge transfer, case study The proper names that are employed in this text are pseudonyms excepting those of the Company founders, the CKO and the Assets Manager All quotes and interview transcripts are authentic, verbatim and have been validated by the Company

 

Share |

Journal Article

To shape practice act on theories  pp11-22

Matteo Bonifacio, Chiara Zini

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Charles Despres, pp1 - 64

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Practice based studies have provided rich descriptions of knowledge dynamics. On the other hand, they led to conceptualizations that question the possibility to view knowledge as a resource that can be oriented and shaped by managers. From this perspective, questions such as why an existing community has developed, or how to enable the emergence of a new community, are still unanswered. Such weaknesses are rooted in a tendency to ignore the cognitive motivations (theories) that lead actors to behave in a particular way. As a consequence, we propose that social practice can be explained as the outcome of interlocking cognitive theories and, moreover, that to shape practice, we need to act on theories.

 

Keywords: communities of practice, situated learning, cognition, knowledge management, organizational learning, theory of action

 

Share |

Journal Article

TREEOR Model: An Approach to the Valuation of Intellectual Capital  pp119-128

María Sarabia, José M. Sarabia

© Oct 2005 Volume 3 Issue 2, Editor: Charles Despres, pp65 - 138

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Following the biological behaviour of a tree and its growth system, this paper proposes a model of valuation of the Intellectual Capital of an organization based on a variation of the classical Lotka‑Volterra equations system. The proposed model explains the growth of an organization as a consequence of its Intellectual Capital (increment of the surface of the roots), its Knowledge (the consumption of nutritious) and its Learning (fertility of the floor). And based on the proposed model, an example with real data is given.

 

Keywords: Intellectual Capital, Organizational Learning, Knowledge Management, Lotka-Volterra system

 

Share |

Journal Article

Implementing Knowledge Through Development Projects  pp139-148

Erik Laursen

© Apr 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ICICKM 2010 special issue, Editor: W.B. Lee, pp85 - 180

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The main objective of this article is the implementation of knowledge in organizations, taking place in the context of development projects. Some of the issues discussed are: What kind of learning conditions do the development projects have to offer? What are the causes and consequences of different levels of engagement from the staff in the projects? Why is often so difficult to transfer what is learned or implemented by the organization during the projects to the everyday activities of the organization after the finishing of projects? In the article a typology of development projects is presented and discussed as different ways of framing the organizational learning processes. The article is based on an empirical study of four organizational development projects (covering the organizations as a whole) run by four Danish upper secondary schools(“gymnasium”). The study included questionnaires as well as interviews with the management and staff, plus a survey of selected written materials and documents . In the various ways in which different groupings among the staff and the management are relating to the project are described. A special focus is set on the different perspectives on the projects established by the staff and the management and how the perspectives have consequences on the actual learning outcomes of the different groups in the organization. Another issue is the weak links between what is experienced by the staff as ‘ordinary problems’ his objectives and goals of the development projects. The theoretical frame of analysis has references to the ‘outside‑in’ perspective on organizational learning, presented by the neo‑institutional theory (Scott 1995 DiMaggion& Powell 1983, Czarniawska & Sevon 2005, Røvik 2007) Nanoka and Takeuchis model of knowledge transformations in organizations (Nonaka & Takeuchi 1995) and of the forms of the knowledge), Argyris and Ellström’s distinction between the learning modes of correction and development (Ellström 2001, Argyris 1992).

 

Keywords: organizational learning, development projects, implementation of knowledge, organizational concepts

 

Share |

Journal Article

Increasing Transferability of Tacit Knowledge with Knowledge Engineering Methods  pp268-279

Thierno Tounkara

© Jul 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ICICKM 2012, Editor: Fernando Chaparro Osorio, pp185 - 279

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Knowledge transfer is a real challenge for organizations and particularly for those who have based their strategy on knowledge codification using knowledge engineering methods. These organizations are facing one major problem: their knowledge repository is used by few persons. Why? In this article, we identify barriers for transfer and appropriation of codified knowledge referential. We show that codified knowledge transfer should be a specific collaborative process taking into account three aspects: complexity and specificity of codified knowledge, readers’ profiles, and exchange channels. Then, we propose to improve knowledge transfer process by developing new specifications for the codified knowledge to increase its transferability and by elaborating a pertinent shared context for knowledge interpretation. It is an empirical methodology which optimizes continuity between knowledge codification and knowledge transfer.

 

Keywords: knowledge management, knowledge transfer, knowledge capture and codification, knowledge engineering, knowledge sharing, knowledge appropriation, organizational learning, organizational memories

 

Share |

Journal Article

ADIIEA: An Organizational Learning Model for Business Management and Innovation  pp91-100

John Lewis

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, Special Edition for ICICKM 2013, Editor: Annie Green, pp89 - 162

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This paper introduces the Innate Lesson Cycle (ADIIEA) as a uniting and integrated framework for business process operations and organizational learning. Thus far, the Knowledge Management (KM) and Organizational Learning (OL) movements ha ve tried to teach OLŽ to organizations as an add‑onŽ while assuming that current business models are sound. Instead, we find that current business models are based on industrial age factory process work, and fail to keep up with the learning and innovat ion demands of the knowledge economy. This paper suggests that these current business models be replaced, not complimented, with a learning‑based model. In the epistemological formulation of this learning model, ADIIEA is compared with the SECI model, and its underlying assumptions about tacit and explicit knowledge as appropriate foundational underpinnings are challenged. Instead of a nounŽ approach to knowledge foundations (tacit and explicit knowledge), a verbŽ approach (questioning, reflective, a nd reactive modes) to knowledge foundations is illustrated to be appropriately compared to required business process operations. Additionally, this approach is shown to be epistemologically aligned with the fundamental symbols of language, where we unive rsally find the question mark, period, and exclamation point, respectfully. From this verb‑based foundation, several applications of ADIIEA are then illustrated to address current issues found in education, business processes, policy‑making, and knowledge systems.

 

Keywords: Keywords: organizational learning, epistemology, theory of knowledge, process management, innovation, knowledge creation, questioning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Developing Systems to Support Organisational Learning in Product Development Organisations   pp167-180

Brian Donnellan

© Nov 2003 Volume 1 Issue 2, Editor: Fergal McGrath, pp1 - 226

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

There are aspects of New Product Development (NPD) business processes that pose particularly difficult challenges to Organizational Learning systems. Short product and process life cycles compress the available time window for recouping the expenses associated with product development. Cross‑functional collaboration in product development organizations requires the merging of knowledge from diverse disciplinary and personal skills‑based perspectives. Cross‑institutional collaboration leads a requirement for knowledge to be combined from participants across multiple collaborating organizations. Transient existence in teams and high turnover results in a reduction in organizational knowledge unless there is a repository for knowledge rather than a dependence on knowledge which is situated in the minds of individuals. High rates of change in turbulent industries, such as electronics, motivates participants in NPD processes to effectively overcome these Organizational Learning challenges. The potential payoff includes time saved by not repeating mistakes and reuse of knowledge that leads to successful products and processes. IS research has paid little attention to NPD processes despite the fact that some IS appears to have the potential to have an impact in that area. Recent research completed by these researchers in Analog Devices Inc identified Organizational Learning challenges encountered by engineering teams in product development. This paper will report on these challenges and will describe how systems were developed to support organizational learning to support the product development process.

 

Keywords: Organizational Learning, New Product Development, Knowledge Management, Knowledge Management Systems

 

Share |

Journal Article

From Individual Learning to Organizational Learning  pp363-372

Delio Ignacio Castaneda, Manuel Fernández Rios

© Jan 2008 Volume 5 Issue 4, Editor: Charles Despres, pp347 - 550

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In the last few years several theoretical models of organizational learning have been developed from the perspective of diverse disciplines. One of the most influential models is that of Crossan, Lane and White (1999), who believe that organizational learning occurs through four processes (intuiting, interpreting, integrating and institutionalizing) and in two ways: from the individual to the organization (feed forward) and from the organization to the individual (feedback). This model, however, attributes to intuiting (defined by the authors as "the preconscious recognition of the pattern andor possibilities inherent in a personal stream of experience" p. 525) the whole explanation for individual learning, ignoring the influence of conscious learning processes. Zietsma, Winn, Branzei and Vertinsky (2002) introduce two modifications to the model: the process of attending and the process of experimenting. The value of their proposal lies in the recognition of the influence of a conscious process in learning, namely attention. Attending, however, is just one of the many processes that intervene in individual learning. Castaneda and Perez (2005) make a contribution to the original model of Crossan, Lane and White (1999) by redefining individual learning from the perspective of capabilities and learning sub‑processes beyond mere intuition that excludes other cognitive processes and forms of conscious learning. Humans have the capacity for symbolization, forethought, learning through modeling, self‑regulation and self‑reflection. Individual conscious learning includes the process of attention; yet, at the same time (according to Bandura, 1986), it includes three other processes: retention, production and motivation. This paper presents an improvement proposal at the group level of the model, adding two conscious processes: conversation and social modeling. Finally, a case is described with examples of each of the new introduced processes, at the individual and group levels.

 

Keywords: organizational learning, individual learning, group learning

 

Share |