The Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management publishes original articles on topics relevant to studying, implementing, measuring and managing knowledge management and intellectual capital.

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Journal Article

The LIFE Technique – Creating a Personal Work Profile  pp57-72

Peter Sharp

© Mar 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

This paper focuses on the question: how can a personal work profile be created most easily and effectively for people considering their future? A personal work profile is a detailed description of the skills a person would like to use and characteristics of a work environment they would like to experience. This is valuable for all people of working age because it helps them find, or move towards, work which suits them best. This is tremendously important in Knowledge Management (KM). This is because when the an individual’s knowledge and skills are matched well with the work they conduct, there is a high level of job satisfaction, motivation and performance. Therefore, if there is a good match, employees and organisations benefit enormously. The paper categorises and critically examines literature relevant to the research question and explains why the new Look Into your FuturE (LIFE) technique (‘the LIFE Technique’) was designed, what is new about it, how it works and how it has been road tested, reflected upon and improved. The primary data strongly suggests that the stages of the Technique are useful and easy to do, and that it is a valuable initiative that should be developed and applied further in the future.

 

Keywords: storytelling, personal knowledge and skills, work profile

 

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Journal Article

From Information Gatherers to Knowledge Creators: the Evolution of the Post‑Graduate Student  pp139-149

Elaiza Benitez, David Pauleen, Tony Hooper

© May 2013 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Ken Grant, pp116 - 182

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Abstract

This exploratory study investigates how post‑graduate students manage information and knowledge and how these skills evolve over time during their post‑graduate studies. The concepts of personal information management, personal knowledge management and brain filtering as well as the critical role of technology are discussed in the context of the post‑graduate learning experience. A short illustrative case study is presented that highlights the evolution in the way that post‑graduate students learn to handle information and develop new knowledge. The study contributes to the still nascent literature on personal knowledge management through increased understanding of the way students learn and their use of technology tools. The findings have implications for universities as well as the private sector to better develop genuine knowledge creators

 

Keywords: personal information management, personal knowledge management, post-graduate study, experience, technology

 

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Journal Article

Middle Management Knowledge by Possession and Position: A Panoptic Examination of Individual Knowledge Sharing Influences  pp67-82

Sally Eaves

© Jan 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Special Edition for ECKM 2013, Editor: Monika Petraite, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper elucidates the spectra of influences that impact the intra‑organisational tacit and explicit knowledge sharing behaviour of the middle line, a boundary spanning layer highly capable to influence, inform and transform. The approach addresses a deficiency in research that affords an eclectic perspective across both knowledge types simultaneously and at an individual level of analysis. Advancing Ipe’s (2003) conceptual work, the Multidimensional Model of Individual Knowledge Sharing Influences integrates robust and multi‑disciplinary theoretical exposition with empirical validation in four leading UK Communication Sector operators. The model encapsulates the direct influence factors of Motivation to Share, Nature of Knowledge, Opportunity to Share, Culture and the Nature of the Individual. Organisational Velocity provides an original conceptualisation of the continual, episodic and ambiguous change that reflects reality in many post‑industrial settings and is expressed as the tension between centrifugal and centripetal forces acting on the other factors. All six dimensions are shown to impact individual knowledge sharing practice, with underexplored constructs such as personality traits and aspects of demography emerging as significant. Organisational Velocity can operate in a moderating and primarily centrifugal capacity on Motivation to Share, Opportunities to Share and the Nature of the Individual. The study demonstrates that a panoptic, pluralistic and interdisciplinary perspective combining human, social, technological and contextual factors must be considered to understand sharing behaviour and optimise knowledge management interventions. A particular element may not be evaluated in isolation. Further, when factor dynamics are sub‑optimum, the middle line may pragmatically orientate towards personal knowledge management mechanisms. Evidence of hoarding, hiding or disengagement from sharing is identified with some managers electing to utilise their knowledge in possession and network positional opportunity to generate rent in alignment with individual and affiliated group interests, negating its aggregation for wider organisational benefit. Implications for research and practice are fully explored.

 

Keywords: Keywords: knowledge sharing, middle management, individual knowledge sharing influences model, organisational velocity, personal knowledge management, knowledge hoarding, hiding and disengagement

 

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Journal Article

A Theoretical Model to Integrate PKM with Kolbs Learning Model for Mitigating Risks From Exhaustive Internet Exposures  pp166-176

Ben Fong, Man Fung Lo, Artie Ng

© Aug 2016 Volume 14 Issue 3, Editor: Vincent Ribiere, pp113 - 190

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Abstract

Abstract: Recent studies on use of Internet among youngsters suggest problematic behaviour and adverse impacts on overall health as there are uncharted boundaries of information and media through Internet. Such related problems include Internet addiction, shyness, alienation, psychological distress and academic performance decrement over time. As a consequence, the ability of students in tertiary education to communicate effectively and interact humanly could deteriorate as they become more accustomed to networking via Internet. However, students nowadays do increasingly rely on the Internet to perform research under the knowledge‑based economy despite concerns over reliability and truthfulness of information available from Internet. Against such a background, we construct a framework for an optimal use of Internet with the main purpose of Personal Knowledge Management (PKM). We argue for an interventionist approach to orient students in tertiary education to develop a strategic mindset that utilizes Internet as a source for developing knowledge about learning outcomes while mitigating the risks associated with over‑reliance and inadequate uses. There are specific skills of PKM for an optimal use of Internet. These skills can be learned in the initiation of a study programme and reinforced in course delivery, which include course assessments and assignments provided. Students are advised on the validated sources, such as electronic databases and e‑libraries that are well‑recognized as knowledge bases for studying and learning. PKM aims to orient students in tertiary education to develop a strategic mindset that exploits Internet as a source for developing knowledge about learning outcomes while mitigating the risks associated with over‑reliance and inadequate uses. The importance of orientation, on‑going monitoring and reinforcing position habits through pedagogies should be emphasized. A key potential benefit of this approach is to prevent students from adopting habits of using Internet that could cause health‑related problems and develop into behaviours that inhibit their future developments.

 

Keywords: Keywords: internet addiction, personal knowledge management, knowledge-based economy, tertiary education

 

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Journal Article

Understanding Personal Knowledge Development in Online Learning Environments: An Instrument for Measuring Externalisation, Combination and Internalisation  pp39-47

Markus Haag, Yanqing Duan

© Jan 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECKM 2011, Editor: Franz Lehner, pp1 - 109

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Abstract

This paper investigates personal knowledge development in online learning environments using the perspective of a model adapted from Nonaka and colleagues’ SECI model. To this end, the SECI model, which was originally designed to describe organisational knowledge creation and conversion, was adapted to conceptualise personal knowledge development in online learning at the individual level. As the SECI model was originally conceived at the organisational level, in order to measure personal knowledge development at the individual level in the context of online learning, a measurement instrument was created in order to measure the scores of individual online learners on Externalisation, Combination and Internalisation. It is argued that Socialisation is not a relevant mode in the context of online learning and is therefore not covered in the measurement instrument; this is explained further in the paper. This measurement instrument also examines the interrelationships between the three modes and a new model – the so‑called EC‑I model – is proposed to depict these interrelationships. The measurement instrument is based on data collected through an online survey, in which online learners report on their experiences of personal knowledge development in online learning environments. In other words, the instrument measures the magnitude of online learners’ Externalisation and Combination activities as well as their level of Internalisation, i.e. the outcomes of their personal knowledge development in online learning. For Externalisation and Combination, formative indicators were used, whereas for Internalisation reflective indicators were used. The measurement instrument is one of the main foci of this paper and is therefore discussed in‑depth. In sum, the paper proposes a modified version of the SECI model, extending the applicability of the original SECI model from the organisational to the individual level. It outlines a new measurement instrument which can be used to measure Externalisation and Combination, i.e. personal knowledge development processes, and Internalisation, i.e. personal knowledge development outcomes.

 

Keywords: personal knowledge development, SECI model, EC-I model, measurement instrument, measurement indicators, online learning

 

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Journal Article

Decentralizing Knowledge Management: Affordances and Impacts  pp114-130

Ulrich Schmitt

© Oct 2019 Volume 17 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp100 - 172

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Abstract

Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) is envisaged as a decentralizing Knowledge Management (KM) revolution and as a vital educational concern. The objective of a current design science research (DSR) undertaking is, thus, the conceptualizing and prototyping of a PKM System (PKMS) aiming at departing from today’s centralized institutional solutions and at strengthening individuals’ sovereignty and collaborations, not at the expense of Organizational KM Systems, but rather as the means to foster a fruitful co‑evolution. This article expands on a recent paper focussing on the PKMS’s affordances in the context of the individual and collective, explicit and tacit knowledge of knowledge workers by integrating twelve renowned models of knowledge creation in a three‑dimensional dynamic ‘public‑transport‑like’ map of holistically portrayed complementing work flows. In further detailing the impacts and benefits for a prospective PKMS user community, the article highlights the major radical changes of the PKM approach according to the decentralization, mobilization, accessibility, granularity, traceability, transdisciplinarity, transparency, diffusibility, negentropy, and synergies of knowledge. The results reaffirm the DSR concept of theory effectiveness aspired to in terms of the system’s utility and communication as well as the PKMS as a sustainable intervention to confront opportunity divides independent of space (e.g., developed/developing countries), time (e.g., study or career phase), discipline (e.g., natural or social science), or role (e.g., student, professional, or leader).

 

Keywords: Personal Knowledge Management (PKM); Knowledge Management (KM); Knowledge Creation Theories; Knowledge Worker; Knowledge Society; Radical Innovation; Digital Platform Ecosystem (DPE)

 

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Journal Article

Award‑Winning Organizations: How Outstanding Organizations Manage the Registration, Access and use of the Knowledge of Employees  pp91-104

Ragna Kemp Haraldsdóttir

© Apr 2020 Volume 18 Issue 2, Editor: Eduardo Tome, pp91 - 184

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Abstract

Organizations have managed information regarding knowledge of employees using various processes such as knowledge mapping, network analysis, codification and personalization. Some of these organizations have been chosen to receive awards for their outstanding performance, for instance for their finest use of knowledge. This paper examines how knowledge award‑winning organizations distinguished themselves from other organizations, when it came to the registration, access and use of the knowledge of employees. The aim was to provide an understanding of how these organizations supported personal knowledge registration, and whether winning an award entailed a more comprehensive overview of the knowledge residing in employees. Whether the organizations benefitted financially from the registration process was also examined. This was a qualitative research. It was a multiple‑case study, covering 18 organizations in Iceland, of which six had received the Knowledge Company of the Year award. A total of 35 semi‑structured interviews were conducted and six award‑winning verdicts analysed. A conceptual model was used to clarify the results. The findings indicate that the award‑winning organizations received the award for outstanding success. Still, little emphasis was put on the management of the personal knowledge of employees. Interviewees experienced adversity regarding costs, time, limited access and use of personal knowledge. Most interviewees claimed that the registration of knowledge had a financial gain but found it difficult to measure and hard to confirm.

 

Keywords: Personal knowledge, Registration, Knowledge award, Intellectual assets, Financial benefits

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 1, ECKM Special Issue / Mar 2011  pp1‑84

Editor: Eduardo Tome

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Editorial

Guest Editor Dr. Eduardo Tomé
Eduardo concluded a PhD in Economics with a thesis on the European Social Fund in 2001 at the Technical University in Lisbon. His main research interests are Social Policy and Human Resources / Knowledge Management / Intellectual Capital. He has published papers in International Refereed Journals as the Journal of Intellectual Capital, the Journal of European Industrial Training, the International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, and the International Journal of Learning and Intellectual Capital. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management. Since 2001 he has presented papers in around 4 international conferences every year.

 

Keywords: nalytic hierarchy process, change processes, co-creation, collective intelligence, competitive intelligence, conceptual learning, hospital-in-the-home units, intellectual capital, KIBS, knowledge interactions, trust-building mechanisms, computer services, case study, KM 2.0, knowledge, knowledge creation, knowledge management, knowledge management maturity, knowledge sharing, knowledge-based development, learning dynamics, operational learning, personal knowledge and skills, problem solving, sensitivity modelling, service business, services, social computing, SPF framework, storytelling, typology, university, user-generated content, Web 2.0, work profile,

 

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